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SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING!
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benny
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 27, 2011 12:41 pm  Post subject: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

STARTING JULY 29, 2011 I WILL BE POSTING SOME ARTICLES THAT I THINK CAN HELP ALL BOWLERS TO IMPROVE THEIR BOWLING GAME!
YOU CAN REACT IF YOU FEEL THERE IS ALREADY A CHANGE IN THE SPORTS OF BOWLING.
JUST WANT TO SHARE WITH EVERYONE, FOR THE LOVE OF SPORTS IN BOWLING!
WATCH OUT!
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 28, 2011 2:16 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Learn Bowling Lane Etiquette

As a relative newcomer to the game or as someone intending to bowl for the first time, there are a few things about how to learn bowling lane etiquette which must be observed while you are on the lanes. Proper lane courtesy makes the game enjoyable for everyone and keeps the pace of play flowing nicely. How to learn bowling lane etiquette begins simply by following a few courtesies.

The United States Bowling Congress (USBC), the sanctioning body establishing the rules and regulations for bowling, offers the following courtesies to make the game pleasurable for all bowlers:

• Be ready to bowl when the pins are set, but wait until the pin setting machine has completed its cycle and the sweep bar is raised to make your delivery. Throwing a ball before the machine is ready may damage the ball or equipment.

• Observe one lane courtesy. The bowler on the right should bowl if both reach the approach at the same time. Stay off the approach while you wait.

• Taking too long to aim or get set up when you are on the approach delays the game.

• Try to remain in your approach area while delivering the bowling ball.

• Step off the approach once you have delivered the ball.

• Good bowling requires concentration. Have fun, but keep in mind excessive movement or noise could be distracting when others are up to bowl.

• Excessive “lofting” hurts your game and damages the lane.

• Get permission to use another player’s bowling ball.

• Refrain from using abusive language or obscene gestures.

• Play the game to win, but be a gracious loser. Good sportsmanship is always the key to a successful game.

• Wet bowling shoes are a safety hazard, watch where you are walking.
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benny
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 29, 2011 2:29 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Exercises For Bowlers

If you wish to learn more about exercises for bowlers, please give some thought to a few practical recommendations for use at home and on the practice lane. As you prepare to bowl in some form of meaningful competition such as leagues, tournaments, or merely bragging rights against fellow bowlers in a practice session, developing an exercise routine can help you tone the big muscles of your body while improving your stretching ability for about 20 minutes per day at home. While at the lanes in preparation for competition, you can also warm up your body so you will be able to make effective and confident deliveries when you begin bowling for score.

Exercises for bowlers begins with stretching exercises. When engaging in a work-out routine at home, stretch your leg muscles by sitting on the floor, extending your legs outward in front of you together, and slowly reach down your calf muscles of your legs and grab and hold your legs with your hands as far down toward your ankles as you are able to stretch. Once you feel a slight burn in the hamstrings of your legs, hold that position for a count of 15 seconds before releasing your legs and relaxing.
Next, widen your feet as far apart from one another as you are able to stretch them and make sure your legs are fully extended so the back of your knees touch the floor. Reach down your legs with each of your hands, left hand on left leg, and right hand on right leg. Reach as far as is comfortable but far enough to feel a slight burning sensation behind your hamstring muscles as in the previous exercise. Hold your legs as close to your ankles as you can without injury and count to 15 seconds before releasing your hands and relaxing.

Finally, bring your feet in so the back of your ankles are as close to your groin as possible and both bottoms of your feet compress against one another and you remain in a sitting position. Use your elbows to press down on your legs just above your knees to stretch the groin muscles on the insides of your thighs toward the floor until you feel a slight burning sensation. Hold and retain the same pressure down on your legs for a count of 15 seconds before releasing your legs and relaxing.

These three leg stretching exercises all can be done from a sitting position on the floor, all should be done with slow and deliberate stretching motions, and you should be able to hold each form for a minimum of 15 seconds. In time, you will be able to reach further down your legs or apply more pressure on your groin muscles and hold the postures longer than 15 seconds. It will amaze you how much you can increase your flexibility of your big leg muscles using these exercises and how much it will help your legs to retain knee flex during your approach while bowling and prevent cramping of your muscles while helping you improve your footwork tempo and reduce fatigue during a long session on the lanes.

Doing other strength exercises at home such as forward leg lunges while holding a bowling ball waist level against your stomach will help you build strength in your thighs and tighten stomach muscles as a by-product. Alternate a leg lunge motion extending your slide leg first until your bowling slide knee flexes to create near or at a 90 degree angle with your lower leg. Hold the form for ten seconds before stepping back to an upright standing position and then extend your opposite leg forward flexing your knee near or at 90 degrees and holding the form for ten seconds, then return to a standing position and repeat each exercise ten times slowly and with good balance keeping your head level and back as straight as possible. Holding the bowling ball is not essential to begin this series of exercises but will increase leg resistance once you develop stamina and help the abdominal muscles tighten at the same time.

A third recommended leg strengthening exercise is to stand with your feet together and rise up onto your toes and hold the form for ten seconds before releasing down to a flat footed standing position. Repeat this exercise no less than ten times slowly and hold the form up on your toes at least 10 seconds before releasing back down to the standing position. As time goes by, you will be able to do more repetitions and hold each form for longer periods of time. You may also wish to hold a bowling ball at waist level against your stomach area while doing the toe rises in much the same way as when you are doing leg lunge exercises. Added weight offers greater resistance to the leg muscles and helps condition and strengthens them to help you in your bowling approach motion.

For your upper body, it is recommended to use light weights such as "dumbbells" or stretch exercise bands with handles so you can do military presses, arm curls, and pulling up motion exercises. Pulling exercises begins with your arms first extended downward and then pulling the band or the weights up underneath your armpit area slowly and returning your arms to the hanging position next to your body. Repeat this exercise ten times slowly and do perhaps three sets of ten repetitions.

Military presses are simply holding your hands under the band handles or the free weights and slowly raising your hands to full extension above your head directly above your shoulders and then return back to a position about shoulder level, then extending again your hands and raising the weights or band handles fully stretched above your head. Repeat this exercise ten times per set and try and do three sets each home exercise session.

Arm curls are simply holding the free weights or band handles down against your thighs where your arms are fully extended down and then keeping your elbows against your stomach area, slowly curl your hands upward until your hands (or weights) lightly contact your chest. Repeat this motion ten times slowly to gain maximum benefit from the resistance and do three sets of ten repetitions each session.

These six simple exercises at home are good simultaneous stretching and strengthening exercises to build endurance and sustaining power while on the lanes. We also recommend cardiovascular exercises such as long walks at a brisk pace for anywhere from a half of an hour to one hour intervals at least five days per week.

Riding a bike or an exercise bike, using a Stairmaster device, or using a treadmill is also great ways to build endurance and cardiovascular stamina for bowling. Of course, for those of you who enjoy jogging, do so in a steady and consistent pace and build to at least one mile, if not more, depending on your age and physical and medical challenges. In many ways, the cardiovascular exercises are more important than strength exercises for bowling but doing both five days per week will get you in good shape in 60 days time so you can gain noticeable benefits on the lanes. When you are in shape, you think better, develop improved stamina, and develop better tempo and ball speed control for longer duration than before training regularly.

Now comes time to warm up at the bowling center before delivering your first ball. Try to spend a few minutes of exercise time doing all stretching before you make your first delivery of your session; get your muscles of your legs and arms loose, warm and ready to bowl. Since we must walk and swing our bowling ball in a synchronized manner and deliver the ball between 18-21 mph accurately and consistently to achieve desired results, it makes sense to stretch your leg muscles near the settee area before beginning to bowl.

Slow and smooth stretching exercises working the big muscles of your legs are a key process to limbering the legs in preparation to bowl. Stretch your hamstring muscles, the big muscles of the legs, to a point where the legs feel warm and stimulated before stepping on the approach and delivering the first shot. Because you must make a good knee flexing motion when sliding and releasing the bowling ball, your legs need to be relaxed, stretched out enough to avoid injury, and allow for a long stride and sliding action into the foul line.

General callisthenic exercises or aerobic exercises used at home are useful for stretching your bowling leg muscles. If you stretch for just a few moments slowly and smoothly before beginning to bowl, you will start off your session with good tempo and good footwork to the foul line. Avoid hurried motions by walking quicker than your best footwork pace during your first few deliveries. Anxiety creates tension and tension keeps your muscles tight. Tight muscles will not move as consistently as when properly loosened and stretched in preparation for bowling.

The same strategy should be used with your arm muscles and with limbering the shoulders before bowling. Again, general aerobic exercises will work nicely regarding your upper body muscles.

Rotate your arms, one arm at a time, in a swinging full-range of motion in large circles slowly and smoothly and then reverse the rotational direction. This type of motion loosens the shoulder sockets and the big muscles of the arm and gets your blood flowing before you bowl. Stretch your arm across your body to a full extension and with your opposite hand placed on your elbow of the arm which rests against your torso; gently stretch the arm so the shoulder muscles get loosened in preparation to deliver the bowling ball.

Stretch both arms in the same fashion individually. It is never a good idea to stretch only one side of your body but rather stretch both legs and both arms in the same manner during the warm up process. It is also a good idea to loosen your hand, wrist, and ankles before releasing a bowling ball at full speed, particularly for those of you living in cold climates.

You might wish to place your hand into your ball and make some practice swings back and forward without releasing the ball. After a few swings, then perhaps you can allow your bowling thumb to release from the hole while keeping your fingers in their holes and catch the "mini-release" in your opposite hand. Flexing your hand open and closed several times also stretches the ligaments in your gripping fingers and gets the blood flowing in your hand.

Finally, make sure your first four or five deliveries are at half speed. Do not rush to release the ball at full operating speed until you have made several deliveries. By building gradually to your full speed, you will retain consistent tempo and good releasing action on the bowling ball as opposed to hurrying your first full-speed deliveries without warming up to the task. Develop a pre-shot routine, like the pro bowlers use, so each time you ready to bowl, you perform your physical stretching exercises and take the first several deliveries at half throttle. Be precise in your warm-up routine just as you wish to be when delivering the bowling ball when in competition.


Since our policy is always to recommend you consult a certified bowling instructor or local bowling professional to help you improve your game, the same holds true with consulting your physician or physical trainer about warming up properly before beginning your session on the lanes. With a good coach and with proper medical advice, you can improve your game enormously. Also, we realize some of you already train regularly and have your own routine and exercises which keep you in good bowling shape. We urge you continue and help your teammates realize the benefits of good physical conditioning.
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 3:26 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Equipment You Should Own

If you are new to bowling and just beginning to take the game with some interest, then it is important to understand a little about which bowling equipment you should own. Bowling centers do provide equipment with free access to the general public. Among the equipment provided by Bowling Centers are bowling balls and bowling shoes.

There are four types of consumer products we highly recommend for any newcomer or beginning bowler as bowling equipment you should own. First, and most importantly, is a bowling ball. Although bowling balls are provided for use free of charge by bowling centers, you should strongly consider purchasing one customized for you personally as opposed to using ones found at local bowling centers.
We also recommend you purchase a pair of your own bowling shoes as opposed to renting them at the local bowling center each time you wish to bowl. Third, we recommend you purchase a new bowling bag, one with sufficient storage space to accommodate bowling shoes and accessories as well as your bowling ball. There are several types of general accessory items which should be carried in your bowling bag along with your ball and shoes so they are ready to use while you are on the lanes.

Bowling balls provided by bowling centers are usually inexpensive plastic bowling balls available to use in varying weight ranges from 6 or 8 pounds for kids and from 10 lbs up to the maximum allowed weight of 16 pounds for adults, all of which are drilled very randomly and with overly large holes to fit bowlers of all ages and sizes of bowling hands. This means that you will undoubtedly not get a ball to fit your hand properly and can be at a disadvantage for two important reasons. One reason is that if a ball does not fit properly, you run a risk of injury to your hand or gripping fingers. Another reason using a “house ball”, as they are called, is a disadvantage is that you will suffer from pinpoint control because the ball does not fit properly and therefore, accurate and precise releases become extremely difficult to make consistently.

Also, plastic balls are typically usually used on very dry lanes with limited lane oil conditioning. If you bowl with a house ball in heavy oil, you will find it difficult for the ball to get good traction on the lane surface and it may not roll effectively upon impact with the pins.

We recommends you purchase your own bowling ball and have a professional pro shop operator measure your hand and fit you properly. It is important that gripping holes are sized to fit your fingers and shaped to accommodate the contour of your fingers and thumb.

The pitch angles the holes are drilling into the ball must also conform to your specific fingers and thumb shape and sizes. Each bowler opens and closes his or her hand uniquely so, as we stated earlier, properly drilled holes can actually help you release the bowling ball effectively and develop good accuracy as well as protect your hand from injury.

There are many, many makes and models of bowling balls to select from at our site along with articles and videos demonstrating new bowling balls rolling down our test lanes designed to help make it easy for you select your new bowling ball.

Another staple offered to the public at local bowling centers which can be rented each time to come to bowl are bowling shoes. Bowling shoes available at your local center for rent are called “house shoes” and are not custom made nor nearly as comfortable nor offer good foot support, durability, or comfort as do bowling shoes sold at our site or in a pro shop.

House shoes are universal shoes designed to fit anyone wishing to rent them and are never quite as sanitary as will owning your own personal custom shoes. For the fee it takes to rent shoes each time you decide to bowl, it would not take long to pay as much in rental fees as it does to own your own shoes in a model and with colors and styles you prefer. Bowling shoes can be a definite advantage to any new or serious bowler and will provide the stability you need for bowling on various approach surfaces.

Owning a bowling bag makes sense so long as you can store shoes, accessories and your bowling ball or balls easily. Bags in the market today come in tote varieties designed to hold one or two bowling balls, shoes, and accessories. There are the popular roller models with retractable handles available inexpensively allowing you to easily wheel the bag into the lanes and back to your vehicle after your bowling session is completed. We recommend a bag for any new bowler which can accommodate at least one more ball than you intend to carry into the bowling center. If you own one ball, using a two ball bag gives you extra space for storage of garments or other goods while stored in the settee area during your time on the lanes. If you eventually purchase another ball, you will not have to purchase another new bag to bring both bowling balls into the lanes. Planning ahead and investing your money sensibly is something we always recommend our customers take seriously.

There are a few accessory items we suggest you purchase with your new bowling ball, bowling shoes, and bowling bag. The Microfiber Bowling Towel is one good accessory every bowler should have ready to use on the lanes. These towels are used for keeping your hands dry from perspiration, to remove dirt, rubber markings from the pinsetter equipment, or lane oil from the ball surface. This microfiber towel retains up to seven times the moisture as cloth towels and is easy to wash and re-use any number of times you choose.

Carrying a brand of skin protection liquid will prevent possible skin irritations from releasing the bowling ball frequently to become painful or become more severe than when they first develop on your bowling fingers. Better safe and ready than sorry. There are liquid bowling ball cleaners available in 4 or 6 ounce squeeze bottles you can carry in your bowling bag which work great to clean lane oil or dirt off of the bowling ball surface when you complete your time on the lanes. Polishes are also available inexpensively to apply after cleaning the surface of your ball to restore the skid ability the ball requires on the front end of the lane.
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PostPosted: Sun Jul 31, 2011 12:49 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

What American Bowling Balls Are Made Of

Learning what American bowling balls are made of consists merely of taking a look at coverstock classifications. Take time to understand which types of coverstock options are available to you in your bowling ball purchase process. The variety of coverstocks available in today's market will help you match your bowling ball with the various lane conditions you likely encounter during competition, regardless of your skill level. Finding out what American bowling balls are made of is, therefore, a simple matter of understanding the types of materials used in creating virtually all coverstocks made by leading domestic manufacturers.

Over the past several decades, a number of coverstocks have been developed by manufacturers ranging from rubber material, to plastic or polyester material, to the first urethane materials, to reactive resin, to sub-categories of reactive resin, to particle materials, and even a brief introduction of epoxy material coverstocks. Let's discuss more closely each type of coverstock classification and begin with the old rubber ball material.
Rubber balls were used prior to the 1980's and mostly prior to the 1970's. The low friction surface coverstock on a rubber ball actually produces slightly more surface friction than doe’s polyester (plastic) bowling balls and is similar to the low grade original urethane coverstocks but not as versatile as urethane material coverstocks, thus the end of the rubber ball era entirely. Rubber bowling balls offered a profound odor when being drilled due to the melting of soft rubber as the drill bit was heating during the drilling process. Rubber balls had really no core design but rather light density inner-fillers in the center of the ball with a weight block near the surface of the ball to provide limited drilling layout options for the pro shop operators. The technology of modern equipment has made the rubber ball antiquated.

Plastic balls, or more properly, polyester coverstock bowling balls which are derivatives of polyurethane substances, replaced the rubber ball in the 1970's and was the dominant ball during the decade. Polyester balls are the least aggressive of all modern day coverstocks available in the market. Plastic balls react least aggressively of all coverstocks in oil and on dry parts of the lane. Plastic balls are good when a bowler needs the ball to go straight up-the boards of the lane, for spare shooting, or perhaps even for extremely dry lane conditions.

Urethane coverstock bowling balls were first introduced in the market circa 1980. The urethane ball has greater angle of entry into the pocket and covers more boards on a given lane condition than does a plastic ball. Urethane is the base material used on other classifications of coverstocks such as reactive resin, hybrid, and particle coverstocks. Recent releases of successful urethane bowling balls are the Storm Natural and the Storm Natural Pearl models, both of which work well to neutralize severe wet/dry lane conditions and on dry lanes where you need control in the mid-lane and smooth and controllable motion on the back end of the lanes.

Reactive resin bowling balls triggered the movement to highly aggressive coverstocks. Reactive coverstocks are composed of similar materials used in regular urethane formations; however, they are blended with different additives. The net effect is that reactive coverstocks provide the "tacky" feeling which translates into additional traction and usually a strong back end reaction on the lane. Sub-categories of reactive coverstocks are the solid coverstock, the pearl coverstock, and the hybrid coverstock, all of which are reactive coverstock bowling balls. Recent releases of reactive resin coverstocks balls are the Strom Marvel, Roto Grip Infinite Theory and the Motiv Primal TV4, all of which are very aggressive coverstocks and usually are selected for use in heavy or medium-heavy oil conditions.

Solid reactive coverstocks have the greatest amount of microscopic reactive pores on the ball surface compared to other reactive coverstocks. The solid coverstock comes in a polished finish, sanded finishes, and with a rubbing compound buffed finish so the degree of surface friction can be controlled within the sub-category of solid reactive bowling balls. Thee AMF 300 OMG! And the 900 Global the Eagle, models are good choices in solid reactive bowling balls.

Pearl reactive coverstocks have the addition of mica material blended into the reactive coverstock material. The inclusion of mica roughens out the microscopic pores causing the ball reaction on dry lanes to be extended in length. Reactive pearl balls have the ability to react quickly to high friction portions of the lane. The mica adds some sparkle to the bowling ball's surface appearance. Examples of pearl reactive bowling balls are the Storm Marvel Pearl, Lane #1 BOOM R-Ang! And the 900 Global Bank Pearl model bowling balls.

Hybrid reactive coverstocks are a combination of solid and pearl reactive covers with the purpose of taking advantage of the benefits of both type coverstocks. Hybrid coverstocks offer the mid-lane reaction of a solid coverstock and the back end reaction of a pearl coverstock. New releases of hybrid coverstock bowling balls are the Roto Grip Infinite Theory and the 900 Global Bank Roll,  both of which offer the versatility of friction match-ups on the lane surface that the hybrid coverstocks are designed to accomplish.

Particle coverstocks are another successful classification which is similar to the makeup of reactive resin balls with the big difference being an addition of microscopic pieces of material in the coverstock blended to reach through the oily lane conditioner and make responsive contact with the lane surface. Unless there is a fairly heavy volume of oil on the front end of the lane, particle coverstocks will create too much surface friction causing the ball to use energy early and conserve too little on the back end and for impact with the pins. Particle coverstocks display noticeable silica particles reflecting from a bright light, as in the case of a camera flash. A new release particle ball is the Lane #1 Time Bomb Black Fire which uses the particle technology in an aggressive reactive resin coverstock.

Epoxy coverstocks made a brief introduction on the market which offered increased traction from the oil portion of the lanes to the dry and offered strong overall hook potential. Epoxy coverstocks have a well documented history, however, of coverstock durability issues, thus adversely affecting the staging power of this type of coverstock. Epoxy coverstocks need improvement in technology for future releases. The most famous Epoxy release was the Columbia 300 Bonanza EPXT1.


American manufacturers have spent endless resources over many years time in developing sophisticated coverstocks so the variety of classifications offer bowler's choices in versatile coverstocks which can be altered or modified for controlling length potential on a variety of oil conditions.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 02, 2011 1:52 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Ball Dynamics and Hook Potential

When watching a bowling ball roll down the lane, it is easy to overlook the forces at work within the ball. The ball is round, and the bowler imparts revolutions, axis rotation, axis tilt and ball speed. The round ball undergoes a transition from to skid to hook to forward roll.
However, unless you own a clear ball with a high power core design, it is difficult to imagine the position of the core and its rotational influences on the hook pattern of the ball. Understanding the shape and density of the core will enable you to evaluate a ball and its possible benefits to your game.
Make no mistake about it! There is no substitute for a good shot. But there is also no substitute for a good ball reaction. Even the best in the game do not repeat every shot. Duplicating the exact launch angle, ball speed, revs rate, axis rotation and tilt, and target accuracy is seldom done twice in a row, much less for an entire game. Having the proper ball reaction helps to minimize the consequences of making physical mistakes. Minimizing the mistakes helps build confidence. Building confidence leads to a looser arm swing and less intervention of the analytical side of your brain when you are on the approach and on the way to the foul line.
Understanding the ball construction and its application to certain physical styles and lane conditions can be of tremendous benefit to your decision making. The basic component of ball construction is Radius of Gyration (RG). This is a measure of the amount of time that it takes a ball to complete a swing rotation cycle. Without getting into scientific measurements, the more the weight is concentrated toward the center of the ball, the faster the ball will swing. This is called Low RG. Its characteristic is to hook sooner. When the weight is located closer to the surface of the ball, the ball will swing slower. This is called High RG. Its characteristic is to have a more delayed breakpoint. The RG of the ball will dictate its breakpoint.
The second measurement of a ball's dynamic potential is called RG Differential or Differential for short. The differential is based on the shape of the core. Every core has a height and a width. Picture a softball. Its length and width are identical. No matter which plane you would perform an RG swing on, the swing time would be identical. This would result in no differential. This type of core would have a smooth rolling, low hook potential. Now picture a tall drinking glass. Its height is disproportionate to its width. There is much more mass vertically than horizontally. This ball would have a large difference between the swing rates. This core shape would have a high differential. Differential causes track flare and is an indicator of the speed of transition from skid to hook once the ball encounters lane friction. RG Differential is an indicator of the amount of hook potential at the breakpoint. This drinking glass core would be an example of a high differential, pin-in ball.
The third measurement of a core's dynamic potential is called Mass Bias. To illustrate mass bias, let's use the drinking glass again. But we're going to add a handle on its side, turning it into a mug. Like the drinking glass, there is a difference in the height and width. But there is an additional difference between the width including the handle and the width without the handle. There is more mass closer to the surface in the area of the handle. There is a second differential between the swing time of the handle side and the side perpendicular to the handle. This difference can be minor, as in the case of a pin out ball, or major, as in the case of a ball using BOMB technology. A pin-out ball would have a small handle, a weaker influence. A BOMB core would have a larger handle, a stronger influence. Mass Bias changes the shape of the breakpoint. By shape we mean the amount of time it takes the ball to go into a forward roll. Forward roll occurs when the ball loses axis rotation (side roll). When a ball achieves forward roll, it has ceased hooking and now is rolling in a linear direction. Promoting a quicker forward roll would be beneficial in heavier oil conditions, promoting a slower transition to forward roll would be beneficial in lighter oil conditions.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 3:39 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Fine Tune Your Bowling Game

If you are a bowler averaging between 120 and 150, then you likely will want to straighten out a few things and fine tune your bowling game. It is surprising how many bowlers spend too little time working to manage their physical game skills, particularly before competition. If you wish to identify a few areas to work on so you can fine tune your bowling game.

Set-Up: Make sure you set your spine angle with perhaps a ten degree forward tilt and with your shoulders fairly level when positioning yourself on the approach. Avoid setting your bowling shoulder too low in comparison to your basic set-up. Dropping the shoulder too low in the set-up, even an inch too low, can cause a variation in your swing path. Maintain a normal amount of knee flex in your set-up and make certain your weight is distributed over your bowling shoes fairly evenly with perhaps a bit more weight on the foot you do not use to take your first step.
Footwork: Walk lightly on the approach to the foul line and avoid digging into the floor and lunging into your slide step. A smooth tempo with your footwork is an important key in making a consistent approach. Even if you are a player with relatively fast footwork, do not exceed your usual pace of walking to the foul line. It is generally best make a smooth start with the first two steps of your approach and then not hurrying the final two steps.

Balance: Keep your upper body torso from making unnecessary movement while walking to the foul line. If you are a power player and you hook the bowling ball a great deal, avoid excessive opening and closing of your bowling shoulder beyond your norm during the arm swing cycle. If you are a direction player who does not hook the ball a great deal, then try to keep the front portion of your bowling shoulder aligned with your target on the lane throughout your approach. Keep your head as motionless as possible while walking to the foul line and while you are releasing the bowling ball.

Swing: Work on a consistent timing sequence to initiate the swing. If you use a long push-away, make sure you trigger the movement early enough without retarding the arm swing movement by holding the ball in front of you when taking your steps. Instead, allow the bowling ball it to drop into the swing freely and smoothly with a continuous movement. If you use a short push motion or allow your ball to fall straight toward the floor when beginning the swing, try to avoid using too much arm tension forcing the ball to the top of the back swing. Arm tension is a major reason for ineffective releases. When your bowling hand reaches the top of your back swing, make an effort to allow it to drop into the forward swing smoothly and consistently without "grabbing" at the ball and increasing tension in your hand just prior to the critical moment of release.

Release: If you hook the ball, try to rotate the ball with your bowling fingers as your hand reaches the release zone by your bowling shoe on your sliding step. You may exit your thumb from the ball prior to your hand reaching the release zone but avoid rotating your hand until your bowling fingers arrive at the laces of your sliding shoe. Regulate the moment of release by keying your thumb to exit the ball at the same relative position each delivery. Focus on speed control. Consistent ball speed allows for the release to repeat effectively time after time. Often times, bowlers try to do much to the ball by trying to help the ball hook instead of relying on the physics of the game and the dynamics of the bowling ball coupled with proper alignment to do the job. Remember, release the ball at a consistent ball speed and avoid forcing an abrupt lifting action onto the ball.

Finish & Focus: Work on holding your form at the line after you release the ball and until your ball passes the targeting arrows. If only for a split second, holding your form and balance position after you release your ball. This process will ensure you are ending your approach in a good finishing position. In fact, if you can hold your form motionless until the ball contacts the pins, then your balance is extremely solid. Focus of your eyes on your target on the lane until the ball passes the target. Do not diminish the importance of focusing on your target with intensity and concentration throughout each delivery. Place full commitment to hitting your target. Expect a positive result by planning for the result in advance.


Bowling swing Consult with your personal certified coach/instructor or a local bowling professional if you are having problems tuning up your game. These tips can help you self-monitor your physical game between visits with your coach. Work on your strengths and you will sharpen your skills.
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benny
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 12:59 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Properly Clean Your Bowling Ball

Learning how to properly clean your bowling ball is fairly easy if you give a little thought these options:
• Pro Shop Services
• Personal Use of Cleaning Agents
• When to Clean Your Ball
Anyone can learn optional methods of how to properly clean your bowling ball. First, one recommended option is to use the services of your local pro shops. Pro shops are equipped with high speed ball spinners and varying grits of Abralon pads and with polishes which allow for your to have the surface of your bowling ball screened with any given texture or grit of pad to prepare for the particular lane conditions you most frequently encounter.
The pro shops also provide polishing compounds so if you need to add polish on top of the screening of the ball surface, you have that option as well. Another feature many pro shops offer is a machine which virtually bakes the oil from the coverstock pores of bowling balls. This machine will clear saturated oil in the ball coverstock and then the ball can be screened on the spinner to add any desired surface texture or grit finish.
Normally, this bake process is not needed nearly as frequently as is a general surface preparation provided by the ball spinners, pads, and polishing agents.
Cleaning bowling balls yourself is easier now than ever. Simply purchasing personal squeeze bottles available in pro shops or very inexpensively here at our site will provide the right agents to clean and to polish your ball by hand. We recommend purchasing one of our microfiber towels, a liquid ball cleaner, and polishes so you can keep the surface of your ball clean regularly. The microfiber towels are great for wiping away lane oil off of your ball surface during your session on the lanes, for cleaning your ball after possible rubber markings from the pit cushions in the pinsetters or from the ball return units, and for applying cleaners and polishes by hand.

It is recommended to clean the surface of your ball immediately after bowling when the pores in the coverstock of the ball are open due to the friction generated by bowling. There are, however, liquid cleaning agents approved for use by U.S.B.C. (United States Bowling Congress) during competition. You now have the option of cleaning your ball with a towel and a cleaner while you are bowling.
Self-cleaning your bowling ball surface and perhaps even adding some polish to the surface after you complete your session on the lanes will buy you time before the need in getting back to the pro shop occurs. Re-screening the surface of your bowling ball on the high speed ball spinner to restore your ball surface and best match to the lane conditions is always the best course of action, however. Hope these tips help?
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:32 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Hold Your Bowling Balance At The Foul Line

When examining how to hold your bowling balance at the foul line, it is important to commit to being in a set and very stable position with your upper body when delivering the bowling ball.  Regardless of how skilled you are, whether you are a professional champion, a top ranked amateur player, or simply a very talented player locally, good shot-making is the objective for anyone who wishes to succeed and it starts with good balance at the line.

Keeping your upper body as still as possible when you slide and deliver the bowling ball and holding your form until the ball approaches your target on the lane is as critical to effective shot-making as any other fundamental component of your game.  This principle of retaining good form at the line and being well balanced is as important now as in the past will never change over time.
How to hold your bowling balance at the foul line can be accomplished by developing and retaining a few physical game techniques and making sure these techniques are a fixed part of your game.  Here are a few techniques to monitor in your game during practice sessions which are designed to help you maintain good form and balance at the foul line:

1. Sliding Leg - make sure your slide leg has sufficient knee flex to support the full weight of your body as you slide into the line.

2. Sliding shoe - Keep your sliding bowling shoe aligned with the boards on the lane and sliding under the center of your body to provide good stability when releasing the ball.

3. Balance Leg - your balance-leg should sweep out of the way in the opposite direction of your bowling arm as you begin your slide and your balance-leg shoe should remain in contact with the floor to stabilize your upper body and counter the momentum built from the bowling ball swinging at a rapid rate on the opposite side of your body.

4. Shoulders - your shoulders should remain in a line directly over the knee cap of your sliding leg and not pressed forward ahead of your knee so the majority of your body weight is centered over your sliding leg and your upper body remains very stable as you release the ball and while the ball travels down the lane toward your target.

5. Head - your eyes must remain fixed on your target and your head should remain as motionless as possible while releasing the ball and after the ball leaves your hand and travels to your target.  Your chin should stay at shoulder level or above so you do not make a sudden body weight shift forward during your release.

6. Follow through - wait for your swing and follow through motion to complete its movement and hold your form for a second or until your bowling ball reaches your target on the lane. Remain as motionless as possible as though you are posing for a photograph and you wish to display good form.

Good balance at the foul line is all set-ups well before you slide into the line. If you maintain good upper body posture from the beginning of your approach and reduce any wasted motion during your approach, you will be able to arrive at the line, deliver your bowling ball, and hold your form until the ball reaches your target.

A proven practice drill is to hold your form after releasing your ball and remain motionless until the ball reaches the pins. If you are able to hold your form ten consecutive deliveries during your practice sessions and not move away from your delivery position until the ball reaches the pins, you will most certainly have excellent balance and be well positioned to make good shots.


Although these simple techniques seem routine and are nothing new to learn, they are vital in assuring yourself every possible chance at maximizing your abilities as a good shot-maker. Don't cut corners. Build into your practice routine the time needed to make certain you are well balanced and in a good position to deliver the ball and then hold your form.
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benny
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 06, 2011 3:06 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How Often Should Your Bowling Ball Grip Be Checked

Learning how often should your bowling ball grip be checked is important for new or beginner bowlers. Everything starts with a proper grip. In bowling, a proper grip begins with proper fitting gripping holes. Once you have your bowling ball equipment measured and fitted precisely by a pro shop professional, it then becomes essential after bowling many games with your given bowling ball to keep the gripping holes contoured and fitting the sizes of your fingers and thumb as closely as when the given ball was first drilled. The more games you bowl, wear on your equipment requires reshaping or re-contouring your gripping holes so you still retain a good fitting grip.

The answer, therefore, to how often should your bowling ball grip be checked lies with how many games of bowling have you accumulated on a given bowling ball since it was first fitted to your hand? Regardless if you use finger inserts and/or a thumb slug or whether you use only the gripping holes drilled into the ball with no inserts, you should easily be able to get 60-80 games of bowling before you need to have the pro shop professional check your bowling ball gripping holes for wear on the edges of the holes or inserts. With the bowling ball rolling down the lane and sent back through the ball return devices, your equipment will encounter erosion or slight wearing effect on the holes over time. Depending on how many games you bowl per week to arrive at 60 - 80 games will determine when exactly you should have your gripping holes checked at the pro shop.
When finger or thumb holes are drilled directly into the ball surface with no use of inserts or thumb slugs, the edges of the gripping holes tend to lose contour and require a beveling technique to re-contour the shape of the top of the holes to help you re-acquire the same feel on your gripping fingers as when the ball was first drilled. Wearing on the hole edges generally makes the holes feel a little sharper than when the holes were first contoured. Many experienced bowlers will purchase and carry a three-sided bevel knife with grip handle in their bowling accessory pouches so the gripping holes can be shaped precisely the way the bowler chooses.

In cases with use of finger inserts, beveling the soft inserts is not always as easy as the hard shell of the bowling ball. It is recommended in these cases to simply have the given finger insert or thumb insert replaced with a new one so the proper fitting and contouring of the gripping holes is restored. Don't forget to check each finger insert if it comes loose and requires more glue to hold the insert in place after 30 - 60 games of bowling or as needed.

After several hundred games of bowling, it is likely you may have to plug and re-drill gripping holes to restore the right length of span to the ball and fit your hand properly once again. Constant beveling of finger and thumb holes has the effect of shortening the span of the ball and then your hand will not fit into the ball quite the same way as when the ball was new and first drilled to fit your hand. Checking with a pro shop professional will help you maintain a good fitting bowling ball.

When you encounter noticeable changes of weight, usually a corresponding change in finger and thumb sizes occurs. If you gain weight and your fingers and thumb swell, make sure you have your bowling ball gripping holes checked by a pro shop professional to make sure you can grip the ball properly and you do not lose effectiveness in making good, clean deliveries.

The same is true if you lose weight; losing weight causes your fingers and thumb to become smaller in size and may require either adding bowling tape (or some sort of gripping insert device to take up the additional space inside the gripping hole) resulting from weight loss. Great care should be taken to keep your gripping holes fitting your hand properly if you wish to develop the skills to make consistent and accurate bowling ball deliveries.

We cannot overlook the importance of placing your bowling fingers and thumb into your ball properly each and every time prior to making a delivery. The manner by which a bowler inserts his or her fingers and thumb into the bowling ball and supports the weight of the ball while taking the stance position on the approach of the lane is commonly referred to as the "grip."

A good grip enables you to properly release the ball and thereby make a good delivery. It all begins with supporting the weight of the ball in your non-bowling hand. Next, softly place your bowling fingers, normally the middle two fingers of your bowling hand, and your thumb into the holes drilled into the bowling ball. Make sure your fingers are inserted as far as the holes permit and the same for your thumb.

A commonly accepted procedure is for the fingers to be inserted into the ball before the thumb. Care should be taken to fit your fingers into the holes of the ball carefully and the in same manner each time you are getting ready to bowl. The same is true for your thumb being placed into the hole of the ball after the fingers are properly inserted.

Your bowling fingers should be inserted down to the second knuckle joint for a conventionally drilled bowling ball so the weight of the ball can be supported by the pads of your fingers leading to the second knuckle joint. For a fingertip grip, your fingers should be inserted down to the first knuckle joint and the weight of the ball will be supported by the pads of your fingers from the tip of your fingers to the first joint.

The thumb must be inserted into the thumb hole of the ball down to the second knuckle joint as to allow the ball surface to rest on the palm of your hand and to the full extension of your thumb. If a ball is drilled properly to custom fit your hand, there should be little or no separation of the palm of your hand from the surface of the bowling ball, regardless of a conventional drilling or a fingertip drilling.

When your hand is placed properly into the holes of the bowling ball, there needs to be slightly more gripping pressure on the finger pads of your hand than on your thumb pad. As new bowlers develop into accomplished players and learn to release the ball effectively, the thumb must be released a split second before the fingers so the fingers may impart the rotational action which causes the bowling ball to travel down the lane with an effective rolling and hooking motion. Gripping too tightly, particularly with the thumb, will slow the action of your hand at the moment of release. It helps to learn to grip the ball properly from the onset so you may develop your skill as a player quickly.


We recommends that every beginner purchase their very own new ball and have it professionally fitted to the specifications of your hand. Improperly fitting bowling balls can potentially cause injury to your bowling hand and can adversely affect a good release and delivery of the bowling ball. We also recommend you take a lesson or lessons from a certified bowling instructor or local bowling professional to help you develop good bowling techniques and to ensure your bowling equipment fits your hand properly.
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:40 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Throw A Strike In Bowling Part 1


Learning how to throw a strike in bowling is a big step to improving your overall scores. The goal of you beginner bowlers, newcomers to the game, or even if you have bowled competitively for some time and have a bowling average up to perhaps 135 or 140, is to deliver your ball into the pocket to give you the best chance at getting a strike. This article will be the first in a three part series of articles how to throw a strike in bowling and is intended in helping understand three key factors:
1. Pocket Location

2. Initial Alignment

3. Alignment Adjustments

Let's begin this first part of the series with addressing the pocket location. The center of the pocket is located on the 17.5 board on the pin deck. Using a right handed bowler as the example, the pocket is on the 17.5 board counting from the right edge of the lane. The center of the "head pin" pin spot on the pin deck is located on the 20 board, the exact center of the bowling lane, which also aligns with the center bowling arrow 15 feet beyond the foul line of the approach and with the center dots on the approach in various distances from the foul line.
A pocket hit is one in which the bowling ball contacts the head pin first on the right side of the pin and then contacts the 3 pin next. Ideally, the angle of entry the bowling ball arrives at the pocket is about a 30 degree impact angle as the ball travels from bowlers right to bowlers left (right handed bowlers) but varies somewhat from player to player and with lane conditions.

With a sufficient angle of entry, the bowling ball will not deflect too severely to the right upon impact with the head pin and thereby will continue into the heart of the pin formation and contact the 5 pin next followed by the 9 pin. This type of entry angle will produce the best chance for a strike result. In some cases with high rev-rate players (those who rev-up the bowling ball and hook the ball a great deal), the ball will actually contact the 8 pin after the 5 pin and because of the high rev-rate and minimal deflection, and the chances of producing a strike are further enhanced.

It is recommended by the bowling ball manufacturers after years of testing and experimentation for you to release the ball between 18 - 21 miles per hour so the ball will generally impact the pins between 15 - 18 m.p.h. instantaneous velocity to give you the best chances of good pin carry and consistent ball motion through the pin deck. An average velocity between 16-18 m.p.h. is suggested for balls traveling down the entire distance of the lane to achieve optimum pin carry and to control bowling ball motion as consistently as possible.

It is fairly common to see new bowlers or social bowlers who have had no coaching exposure try to hurl the ball at speeds far faster than recommended by bowling ball manufacturers. When you, or any bowler rolls the ball too fast, the pins are launched at impact higher from the pin deck than desired for optimum pin carry and travel around the neck of adjacent pins or over the top of other pins instead of around the middle of nearby pins where the pins have a wider diameter. There is a science to good pin carry. Rolling the ball too fast can be as ineffective to consistent and effective pin carry as does rolling the ball too slowly.

Good pin carry also allows you to hit the pocket slightly high toward the head pin and contact the three pin while still getting a strike. This type of high-pocket hit usually results in the four pin (right handed bowlers) tilting over as the final pin to fall. In bowling slang, this is known as "tripping the four pin." Left handers will see the six pin topple last on a high pocket hit on the left side of the head pin.

By the same effect, a light pocket hit will result in either the 5 pin slashing across the pin deck to the 7 pin spot instead of being sent straight back into the pit as in the case of a solid pocket hit. A lighter pocket hit than slashing the 7 pin is one in which the ball barely contacts the head pin and the head pin bounces off of the kick panel near the 7 pin and then the 4 pin, the 7 pin, and the 5 pin are toppled by the head pin and 2 pins bouncing on the pin deck. This type of pocket strike is known commonly as a "wall shot."

When your bowling ball enters the pocket at an optimum speed and at a good angle of entry, your chances of striking are maximized. Don't expect a strike every time you hit the pocket but do try and hit the pocket every first ball delivery. Your percentage of strikes will increase as your number of pocket deliveries increases. It is certainly possible to get a strike on off pocket hits but your chances of striking repeatedly are best when your ball enters the pocket as described above.
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2011 12:00 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Throw A Strike In Bowling Part 2

Learning how to throw a strike in bowling part 2 is a big step to improving your overall scores. The goal of you beginner bowlers, newcomers to the game, or even if you have bowled competitively for some time and have a bowling average up to perhaps 135 or 140, is to deliver your ball into the pocket to give you the best chance at getting a strike. How to throw a strike in bowling Part 2 will be the 2nd in a three part series of articles and is intended in helping understanding the second of our three key factors:
We addressed the first item in our previous article, the pocket location, so let's now discuss initial alignment. The bowling arrows are located about 15 feet past the foul line toward the pins and are in a triangular configuration. From bowler's right to left (for right handed bowlers), the arrow nearest the edge of the lane is referred to as the "first arrow" and is located about 5 inches from the edge of the lane surface and the next arrow toward the lane center is the 2nd arrow which is located on the 10 board from the right edge of the lane. Opposite is true for left handed bowlers. Since the 4th arrow (center arrow) is aligned on the 20 board as is the head pin and the five pin on the pin-deck about 60 feet from the foul line, the pocket is located just 2.5 boards to the right of the 4th arrow on the 17.5 board.

New bowlers without any coaching typically roll the bowling ball from random angles on strike deliveries. These bowlers achieve random results and seldom improve because they have no system of initial alignment nor for adjustments. It is important to use the lane oiling procedure found in most bowling centers in the country as an aide and alignment guide.

The highest volume of oil conditioner is generally applied to the lane surface located between the 2nd arrow on the right of the lane and the 2nd arrow on the left side of the lane. Also, the heaviest volume of oil is located from the foul line where the bowling ball first contacts the lane surface down the lane to approximately 20 feet distance past the foul line. Of course, each bowling center has its own oiling procedures, but in most cases, the 2nd arrow is a good place for an initial alignment to the pocket.

If you roll a perfectly straight ball delivery, you will have to use an angle from about the 6 or 7 board from the edge of the lane just beyond the foul line toward the 10 board (2nd arrow) and continuing down the lane to the pocket at 17.5 board. Your sliding bowling shoe should end up with the instep about 5 boards left of the release point where your ball first contacts the lane surface just beyond the foul line (again, for right handed bowlers), the 11 or 12 board in this example for straight ball players.

If you have a modest curve or hook ball delivery, then you will use an angle from left of the 10 board, say about the 13 or 14 board just beyond the foul line, your slide shoe instep will cover the 19 board when completing your slide into the foul line, and your ball will continue toward the 10 board or 2nd arrow, and then continuing further down the lane to the break point about two-thirds the way down the lane, and then finally hooking to the pocket on the pin deck.

Power players, those players using a high revolution delivery and those who produce a lot of hook on the bowling ball, will use a wider angle toward the 2nd arrow target on the lane than will the modest hook player. Players using a great deal of hook and a high risk and high reward scenario awaiting them. A modest hook delivery will be the easiest to get into the pocket consistently on standard house lane conditions but the power player and the big hook delivery will create a strong angle of entry into the pins and produce the greatest percentage of pin carry and strikes. The greater hook you roll, the more challenging it is to be accurate.

In cases with bowlers using "back-up" ball deliveries or with very sharply hooking deliveries, more extreme angles to the 2nd arrow will be necessary so the ball will ultimately end up hitting the pocket. We always recommend consulting a certified bowling instructor or local bowling professional to help you with an initial alignment procedure. Knowing how to align yourself on the lanes and where to site as a target matching to the oil conditions on the lane surface is key in achieving success and in throwing strikes. Please do not shy away from taking a bowling lesson if you are in doubt about how to align yourself and which target to site.

Part 3 of this article series will help you how to make alignment adjustments to you can continue to hit the pocket and to strike. Please get out to the practice lane and bowl as often as you can. Hope this helps you learn initial alignment.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2011 11:48 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Throw A Strike In Bowling Part 3

Learning how to throw a strike in bowling is a big step to improving your overall scores. The goal of you beginner bowlers, newcomers to the game, or even if you have bowled competitively for some time and have a bowling average up to perhaps 135 or 140, is to deliver your ball into the pocket to give you the best chance at getting a strike. How to throw a strike in bowling part 3 will be the 3rd in a three part series of articles and is intended in helping understanding three key factors:
1. Pocket Location
2. Initial Alignment
3. Alignment Adjustments
We addressed the first two items in parts 1 and parts 2 of this series, so let's discuss alignment adjustments. Depending on your release technique, targeting the 2nd arrow is the logical place to begin your deliveries while warming up for a session on the lanes and as referred to in Part 2 of this article series.

As an example for a right handed player (opposite is true for left handed players) place your bowling shoe instep to cover the 20 board, the center board on the lane approach, and target the 2nd arrow (the 10 board) on the lane near the bowling guides about 15 feet distance past the foul line. If you roll the ball straight, you will have to adjust your angle by placing your feet further right on the approach, perhaps 5 boards further right on the approach at covering the 15 board, and site the same 2nd arrow target on the lane.

If you hook the ball a great deal, then you will need to align your bowling shoe to cover a board further left than the 20 board depending on how much you hook the ball while still sighting the 2nd arrow as your initial target on the lane.

Adjustments from this initial alignment will be needed when a ball is delivered accurately toward the 2nd arrow but does not end up solidly impacting the pocket. Make sure you are delivering your ball at a consistent ball speed each delivery before making an adjustment.

The amount of lateral adjustment for missing the pocket from your initial alignment, either to the left or to the right, depends on how far you missed the pocket after rolling your ball over your target. One proven and tested system over the years is a "parallel adjustment system." This system simply means to move your feet two boards on the approach while adjusting your target on the lane one board (half as much as your feet positioning), in the same direction, either to the left or to the right, depending on whether your ball missed the pocket solidly to the left or to the right. Simple enough!

For example, right handed bowlers (left handers may use an opposite adjustment technique), moving your feet two boards to the right right and your target on the lane one board right is a good adjustment when your ball slides too far and misses the pocket solidly to the right. This angle adjustment automatically closes your delivery angle on the lane and creates a more direct route for your ball to travel and contact the pocket.

If after adjusting 2:1 ratio to the right and your ball still does not make it to the pocket solidly, then adjust another 2:1 boards to the right. Continue making 2:1 ratio adjustments until your angle matches to the oil conditions and your ball finally contacts the pocket solidly. By the way, the pocket is located on the pin deck and at the 17.5 board.

Adjusting in the opposite direction, 2:1 boards to the left from your initial alignment positioning, will work for lanes which have less than heavy oil and which causes your ball to hook too early and miss the pocket to the left (again in the case of right handed bowlers). Multiple adjustments of 2:1 boards, either left or right, will either close your angle to the pocket on oily lanes or open your angle to the break point down the lane on dry lanes.

After your initial alignment, the lane conditions will change in time depending on how much bowling is done on the lane during a given session. In the case with league bowling, you may have to make your first adjustment for the pocket perhaps before your first game is completed, depending on how many bowlers are on your pair of lanes. You might need to make several adjustments during your league session on the lanes. Be ready to react and make an adjustment once you roll a good delivery and your ball no longer contacts the pocket solidly.

Of course, parallel adjustments may also be made in increments of 1:1 ratios for the fine tuning adjustments and in ratios of 3:1 for greater angle changes to the break point down the lane. The 2:1 common parallel adjustment typically works very effectively on most house conditions and if the oiling conditions are not too severely oily or dry.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:21 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Stance Position

Taking a proper bowling stance position is an important key to making an effective approach and delivery of the bowling ball. The stance position establishes correct body posture, balance, positioning of the ball in your set-up, leg action and overall alignment.  Everything works off of a solid stance position. Establishing a “pre-shot routine” whereby the identical set-up procedure is taken every time you step onto the approach will enhance your chances in making an effective delivery.
Here are a few essential elements in taking a bowling stance position:
1. Before stepping onto the approach surface, make sure you know precisely where you wish to position your feet. Pay attention to your distance from the foul line and to your positioning relative to the boards on the lane.
2. Place your feet pointing slightly toward your target with the toes in the same direction and spread your shoes perhaps one board apart for balance and stability.
3. Flex the knees forward as to place the front of your knee caps directly over the toes of your shoes. Flexing the knees slightly will bring the big muscles of your legs into play and create automatic leverage during delivery. Maintain knee flex throughout the approach to the foul line.
4. Lean forward about 10–15 degrees as to align your shoulders in a direct line over your knees. Place the bowling ball in your hand immediately in front of your bowling shoulder and as close to your body as is comfortable. The closer the ball is to your body, the more relaxed are the arm muscles.  Maintain this relationship of shoulders above the knees throughout the walk to the foul line to ensure good balance and stability while releasing the ball.
5. Keep your head level with the chin up pointing to your target so you would be able to easily balance a book or glass of water on top of your head. Try and maintain this same position of your head throughout the approach to the foul line with your eyes fixed on your target to help you maintain good overall balance.
These five elements will establish a good bowling stance position.  Consistently good results in bowling occur only by means of a well-planned “pre-shot routine” and most importantly, a good stance position
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 16, 2011 2:20 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Footwork

Accuracy is linked to good bowling footwork. Good footwork provides the core of a solid foundation and transportation mechanism to the foul line. If you wish to improve your bowling footwork, please focus on three important keys which will help you sharpen your skills.

1. Length of Steps – Taking steps which match your normal walking stride usually produces a consistent approach to the foul line. The strategy is to not bounce or lose balance during your approach so you can make consistent and precise deliveries. Establishing the correct length of stride of your steps is essential so you achieve a solid footwork foundation from which to bowl. Bowlers 6 feet in height will typically use about 12 feet plus perhaps 6 inches more allowing for the slide for an approach. Since the set of dots at the mid-point on the approach measure 12 feet from the foul line, then a 6 foot tall bowler using a four step approach will likely be positioned on or near the these dots on the approach floor. If you are shorter than 6 feet and do not have a long walking stride, then position yourself closer to the foul line. Naturally, bowlers using five steps should allow more distance from the foul line accordingly. Try and make sure you finish with your sliding foot only 6 inches or less from the foul line and not well behind the line so you do not drop the ball behind the line killing effective ball rolling action or so you need not heave the ball too far air-born just to clear the foul line.

2. Tempo - The pace of your steps should be slow enough as to produce a smooth walking motion to the foul line with a slight heel-to-toe action on the steps leading into the slide step. Each step should match in pace with the previous and be uniform in length or close to uniform in length as to prevent loss of balance. The slide step should glide into the approach evenly and your momentum built from the first steps should enable you to slide smoothly as to maintain balance and be in a good position to release the bowling ball. Hastening the slide step or pushing off too quickly from the step before the slide can cause a thrusting action into the foul line and usually causes a hurried release of the bowling ball. It is important to maintain the same pace each step and for each delivery during your session on the lanes.

3. Direction – An extremely important key to accuracy and to consistent approaches is the direction you walk to the foul line. It cannot be emphasized enough how vital walking your lines consistently is to achieving a target-seeking arm-swing and accuracy in your deliveries. A good objective is to walk perfectly straight to the line as to end on the same board with your sliding foot as where the foot was positioned originally in your set-up position. Regardless of where you position yourself laterally on the approach for spares or for a strike ball delivery, it is a good goal to not drift away from where you began. Try making steps which are placed under your chin or under the center of your body to maintain balance and result in an effectively straight path to the line. Visualize the tight-rope acrobat in a circus arena moving carefully down the wire. Each step is measured in length and directly under the center of the body for maximum balance. Try to limit your drift to about two boards from your set-up alignment and your arm-swing will produce a high degree of accurate deliveries.

These three key elements will help you establish good bowling footwork and will result in improved accuracy.
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