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SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING!
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benny
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 17, 2011 1:11 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Balance

Maintaining good bowling balance during your approach is extremely important in making an effective bowling ball delivery. Maintaining good posture and being in an athletic position at all times during the approach to the foul line are key to good bowling balance. The position of your upper body at stance and throughout the approach to the foul line will encourage consistent releasing action because of a stable body positioning during your sliding step.

In the stance position, lean forward about 10-15 degrees upper-body tilt, allow your backside to push outward slightly, and flex your knees as to bring the knee caps directly over the toes of your shoes. This stance will encourage a solid, athletic body set-up position before you begin walking to the foul line. This posture should be maintained during the slide and release.

Place the bowling ball in your bowling hand immediately in front of your bowling shoulder and as close to your body as is comfortable. The closer the ball is to your body, the more relaxed are the arm muscles and the desired arm-swing path will be achieved. Maintain this relationship of shoulders above the knees and the degree of upper-body tilt throughout the walk to the foul line to ensure good balance and stability while releasing the ball.

Keep your head steady with the chin above shoulder level and pointing to your target so you would be able to maintain balance and stability throughout the approach to the foul line with your eyes fixed on your target. Remain motionless with the upper body at all times during the approach and as stable as possible while releasing the ball during the sliding step. Avoid unnecessary upper-body elevation changes, either upward, downward, forward or back, during the approach and the release. Consistently good results in bowling happen with a solid foundation linked with a stable, upper body positioning during the entire approach.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 20, 2011 12:31 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Convert The Ten Pin Spare

If you are a right handed bowler and wish to learn how to convert the ten pin spare, then follow these quick tips. For the ten pin spare, move to the far left side of the approach with your slide foot aligned with the left edge of the lane. Next, target the center arrow about fifteen feet past the foul line if you roll the ball on a straight line or if you use a bowling ball with a stiff cover which does not promote a hooking action. The opposite move to the right side of the approach will work for left-handed bowlers for the seven pin spare.
If you hook the ball, sight to the right (right-handed bowlers) of the center arrow, perhaps two or three boards to the right, and allow for the ball to hook slightly and still maintain its direction toward the spare. Be sure to slightly align your hips and bowling shoulder to face the ten pin and maintain that alignment as you walk to the foul line and make your delivery.

One very important key in learning how to convert the ten pin spare is to “walk your line” and do not drift excessively to the center of the approach. Drifting to the center of the approach will reduce an effective angle to the spare and the ball will either miss to the inside of the spare by hooking away too soon or fall into the channel.

The number one reason bowlers miss the ten pin spare is because of drifting off of the desired target path created by the initial alignment on the approach. The other most common reason bowler’s miss the ten pin spare is because of ball speed changes, usually trying to deliver the ball much faster than normal. These tips will help you improve converting the ten pin spare.
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2011 3:05 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Make Angle Adjustments on Oily Lanes

If you are trying to learn how to make angle adjustments on oily lanes, then kindly consider the following keys to guide you in hitting the pocket consistently:

1. Lane Oil Conditions
2. Initial Alignment
3. Angle Change for Oily Lanes


Everything in learning how to make angle adjustments on oily lanes begins with an understanding of the lane conditions and with good initial alignment. The lane oiling conditions are always the essential element in determining how to line up initially. Oily lane conditions have the greatest concentration of oil on the front end of the lane, the front twenty feet of the lane typically, and in the middle portions of the front end of the lane between the 10 board on the left side of the lane and the 10 board on the right side of the lane.

In most bowling centers, the oiling pattern during the day time hours will allow bowlers to line up somewhere around the second arrow or tenth board from the edges of the lane (right side for right handers, left side for left handers) and to place their alignment foot on or near the center "Dot" on the approach which corresponds to the 20 (twenty) board or the center board. Placing the instep of the left shoe (for right handed bowlers) covering the 20 board will position the outside of the bowling shoulder very nearly in front of the 10 board or second arrow. Therefore, initial alignment on freshly oiled lanes usually means targeting or spotting the 10 board or very near that 10 board, perhaps at the 8 or 9 board or even the 11 board depending on the bowler.

If you use this alignment positioning when you begin all of your sessions on the lanes, then you will base angle adjustments on oily lanes from this initial alignment. After making a few deliveries and you warm up and reach your normal ball delivery speed range, you can then "read" the lane condition and make angle adjustments accordingly. Once you feel you have the best of your available bowling balls in hand and you are not seeing your ball finish squarely in the pocket but rather coming in light on the head pin or perhaps missing the head pin to the right (right handed bowlers) when you make a good delivery over your selected target board, then making adjustments to the right side of the approach by changing your angle to the pocket is the next step.

Generally speaking, if your ball does not roll or hook soon enough due to excessive lane oil conditions and slides too far missing the pocket to the right (right handed bowlers - opposite for left handers), then adjusting the positioning of your feet on the approach and your target on the lane to the right is a dependable adjustment. A good technique is to move your feet two boards on the lane and your target with your eyes one board in the same direction and to the right on oily conditions so you automatically make an effective angle change and increase your chances of the ball hitting the pocket. Be sure to move both your feet and your target on the lane together and in the same direction. There are always exceptions to any "rules of thumb" such as 3:1 ratio adjustments or 1:1 ratio adjustments, but this angle change technique of 2:1 is effective and very useful for nearly all oily lane conditions.

Don't be afraid to make multiple adjustments in 2:1 ratios with your feet and eyes at the target area until you achieve a desired result. Sometimes moving the feet 4 boards and the eyes 2 boards is required to make the necessary angle adjustment so your ball hits the pocket squarely. In some cases, greater adjustments are needed such as 6:3 or perhaps 8:4 adjustments. If your ball misses the head pin to the right entirely, expect to make angle adjustments at a minimum of 4:2 ratios, perhaps even in greater ratios. Also, expect to make occasional angle adjustments while you bowl or when you change lanes.

Your feet are not nailed to the floor - do not fear making angle adjustments but do remember to try and follow these recommended techniques so your ability to hit the pocket consistently improves over time. Do not be afraid to practice these angle adjustments for oily lanes during practice session (open play) by sweeping the practice lane to the right in prescribed ratios so you emulate changing conditions in your competitions and making angle adjustments an easy process.

We hope these tips help you learn how to make adjustments on the lanes.

Next topic that I will share with you is How To Improve Your Bowling Accuracy! See you tomorrow!
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2011 2:25 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Make One Good Shot at a Time

If you wish to improve your performance, then focus on making one good bowling shot at a time. Practice with purpose. Focus on key elements of your game and on making one good bowling shot at a time. Remain in the "here and now."

Here are some tips:

1. Try and keep your target aligned with the edge of your shoulder throughout the approach and into the "release zone." Focus your eyes on the target throughout the approach, the delivery, and until the ball passes your target. Maintain an athletic posture during your approach.

2. Focus on a consistent pace or tempo of footsteps. Try and avoid accelerating your steps excessively. Allow sufficient time for your arm-swing to match your steps in tempo. The final two steps of your approach are the most critical. Fast steps will cause hurried and inaccurate releases.

3. Begin your arm-swing toward your target slightly before beginning the first step of a four-step approach and do not rush the process. Allow the downswing to flow freely to the top of the backswing in one uninterrupted motion, then allow the ball to swing freely and without arm control downward until the ball reaches the "release zone." Try to maintain a consistent tempo on the backswing and forward swing on each delivery.

4. Practice "letting your hand follow the ball to your target!" If your hand follows through in the same direction of your target on the lane, then the ball will likely follow in the same direction. Keep your chin pointed to the same target.

5. Hold your form at the foul line. Pose until your ball passes your target. Balance during and after the critical release of the ball is vital to accuracy and good results. Avoid moving your head and shoulders until the ball leaves your hand and passes your target. Think about making one good bowling shot at a time by "making a good start and a good finish" with your eyes fixed sharply on your target.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 29, 2011 2:49 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Reasons to Use a Bowling Wrist Device

Use a bowling wrist device to help you release your bowling ball consistently and maximize the power of your existing release technique. Regulating the important "moment of release" and imparting consistent finger rotation onto the bowling ball are easy to do when you use a bowling wrist device. Here is how it works:

1. The wrist device will support the back of the wrist on your bowling hand and prevent total collapsing of the wrist prior to the release of the bowling ball. The purpose of the device essentially is to limit movement of the wrist. The limited wrist movement serves to regulate the relationship of the thumb exiting the ball to the fingers imparting rotation on the ball. It is important to understand your thumb should exit the ball slightly before the fingers as to allow the weight of the ball to fall onto the fingers for a split second before your fingers impart the rotation action onto the ball.

2. Some wrist devices greatly limit movement of the wrist and the fingers because of a longer support structure behind the bowling hand than other devices provide. No doubt experimentation will be necessary before finding the best device for your needs. Generally, the longer support structure behind the hand, the wrist hinging movement and finger movement will be restricted leading to a positive releasing action.

3. Because of the limited movement of the wrist hinging back and remaining in a fixed position as your hand enters the "release zone", your bowling thumb will exit the ball before the fingers and you will notice the ball gaining an effective roll on the front end of the lane. Getting the thumb out of the ball quickly will cause the weight of the swinging bowling ball to fall onto the fingers and the fingers can rotate the ball quickly as the final activity of the release action.

4. Without use of a wrist device, the wrist typically will hinge back before the release and cause the fingers to exit the ball before the thumb. The noticeable effect is that the ball will skid a long distance because of the lack of effective finger rotation at the moment of release. Long skid with little or no finger rotation will create the least powerful rolling action on the ball as it travels down the lane.
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 30, 2011 4:19 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Become A Better Bowler

If you are a beginner bowler or a newcomer to our game and wish to learn how to become a better bowler, then it helps to practice fundamental components of a good bowling approach and to also learn to align yourself with an appropriate down lane target. Since professional bowlers fight to maintain a high standard of performance and thereby practice their craft with great frequency and with detail and purpose, then you should expect to increase your time on the lanes to learn how to become a better bowler.

It helps to develop a simple outline of the key components of the physical approach to the foul line and then divide your practice sessions into 10 minute increments and focus solely on about six key elements of your game during those intervals so your practice time of one hour covers the fundamentals needed to sharpen your bowling skills.

1. For 10 minutes, work on balance and maintaining an athletic posture during your approach from the set-up position to the completion of the approach. Avoid any head movement during the approach and particularly during the release of the bowling ball. Keep your head steady at all times and reduce the amount of upper body movement while you walk to the line and during the release of the bowling ball. Visualize the high-wire acrobat at the circus walking the wire with a very steady head and in a straight line as to maintain good balance and to successfully traverse the wire. Remember, less moving parts, less chance for error!

2. For the next 10 minutes, focus on a consistent pace or tempo of footsteps. Try and avoid accelerating your steps excessively as to allow sufficient time for your arm-swing to match in tempo. Count cadence silently allowing about one second on each step until you release the ball. The final two steps of your approach are the most critical and should not be hurried. Try and strive for a consistent pace of steps each and every delivery so your arm-swing can rely on the same amount of elapsed time each delivery.

3. During the next 10 minutes, begin your arm-swing toward your target slightly before beginning the first step of a four-step approach and do not rush the process. Allow the downswing to begin in a shaped motion as opposed to a push out-pull back motion. Shaping the beginning of the swing as to allow a freely flowing swinging of your bowling ball to the top of the back swing in one uninterrupted motion, then allow the ball to swing freely and without arm control downward until the ball reaches the "release zone" is a desired method. Try to maintain a consistent tempo on the backswing and forward swing on each delivery so your bowling hand has a consistent amount of time to complete a good release of the bowling ball and regulate ball speed.

4. For the next 10 minutes, practice "letting your hand follow the ball to your target!" If your hand follows through in the same direction of your target on the lane with your bowling elbow maintaining alignment directly behind your bowling hand, then the ball will likely follow in the same direction toward your sighted target down the lane, provided you have selected an appropriate target. Keep your the cleft area of your chin pointed to the same target and your eyes focused with "laser-like precision" on your target down the lane.

5. For the final 10 minutes of a one hour practice session, hold your form at the foul line. Pose until your ball passes your target. It takes only about 2.1 seconds to 2.5 seconds for your bowling ball to travel down the lanes and impact the pins and only about 1 second or less to reach the targeting arrows so holding your form and follow through position and maintaining good balance for that split second during and after the critical release of the ball is vital to accuracy and to achieving good results. Avoid moving your head until the ball leaves your hand and passes your target and maintain eye contact on your target until your ball passes the target so you know in an instant if you were successful hitting the target or which direction and by how much did you miss. Discipline and patience will help you become a better bowler and improve your technique. Practice as often as possible if you expect good results!
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:17 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Make Your Bowling Ball Hook More

If you are trying to learn how to make your bowling ball hook more, then begin with understanding four available options:
• Alter Your Bowling Ball Surface
• Change Of Bowling Balls
• Release Change
• Alignment Adjustments
Pro shops provide services to prepare bowling ball surfaces to match best with lane conditions in local centers. Use of high speed ball spinner to screen and re-surface the coverstock of your bowling ball is the best method of properly dulling your ball surface. Pro shop operators will use Abralon pads with various grits to screen the ball surface to a known texture. The lower the Abralon grit on the pad, the more porous and textured the ball surface becomes. A 500 grit pad will allow for the most aggressive friction factor on the lanes and works best if your bowling in heavy oil.

Generally speaking, no one complains about their bowling ball not hooking enough on dry lane conditions. Because of very heavy concentrations of oil on the front end of the lane, screening your ball surface with a low grit pad will help you learn how to make your ball hook more and attain an earlier response in the heavy oil than with a ball surface which is smooth or saturated with oil. Remember, a bowling ball constructed with a hard polyester coverstock will not dull sufficiently to hook a great deal more than when first drilled out of the box. However, the reactive resin coverstock balls with aggressive core designs will respond more noticeably than will low friction reactive balls or polyester balls. Don't be afraid to change bowling balls in competition and switch to a ball with an aggressive coverstock prepared to combat heavy oil.

Changing your release to create more hook can be tricky and in many cases, cause a series of poor deliveries unless you are well practiced with the use of a variety of releases. A pronounced rotation of your bowling fingers from directly underneath or behind the bowling ball to a point about 3 hours on the clock dial ( 6 o'clock to 3 o' clock for right handed bowlers) occurring at the moment of release when your arm reaches a vertical position to the approach surface on the forward swing motion will certainly maximize your hook potential. Be careful not to rotate your entire arm but rather only your wrist action. Another tip is to use a wrist device which allows for a setting to be adjusted to create upward wrist tilt. Tilting the wrist upward while you are releasing the ball will fly your thumb out of the ball well before the fingers so the fingers can rotate the ball decisively and create additional revolutions on the ball or increase the amount of tilt in the rotating axis of the ball.
Adjusting your alignment positioning on the approach toward the edges of the lane so your ball will roll on a dryer portion of lane surface will create increased friction and cause your ball to hook sooner and cover more boards on the lane than if the ball were to travel in heavy oil a longer distance. A well known strategy is to adjust your feet closer to the edge of the lane (to the right edge for right handed bowlers) two boards and your target on the lane where your eyes sight one board - a 2:1 adjustment. This type of adjustment system is known as a "parallel adjustment" and may be done multiple times until you achieve desired results. We hope these tips help and be sure to practice as much as possible.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 1:22 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Improve Your Bowling: Practice With Purpose

It is amazing how many highly skilled bowlers will practice without any game plan or without any useful structure.  If you wish to learn how to practice with purpose, then kindly consider the following keys to guide you in doing so:

1. Develop a Practice Plan
2. Physical Game
3. Equipment
4. Lane Play
Any successful coach or coaching school in the past and in the present always develop an organized process or structure by which students are to practice their bowling.  The most successful players practice with the end in mind!  Professional businessmen will not begin a new venture without a detailed business plan.  Professional bowlers, those who compete regularly on the pro tours and make a living doing so, practice with an intent to focus on specific areas of the game to maximize in an organized fashion to benefit from the time spent on the practice lane.

If you are not among those who have not developed a specific structure by which to practice, a matrix or outline, then we highly recommend you do so right away.  Prepare your own checklist containing a matrix of the physical components of your game, bowling equipment, and the process of alignment, targeting, and lane adjustments so you may rehearse on the lanes and away from competition.  You can develop one master matrix containing all four headings or four matrices, one per heading.  An organized structure is one way in learning how to practice with purpose and is an integral key to sharpening your overall skills.

You can easily build your own bowling matrix or outline, if you will, and spend a dedicated amount of time during each practice session on each element in the matrix.  As example, when working on physical game elements of the matrix, develop perhaps four keys to your game and spend about 10-15 minutes per element working on specific keys to strengthen those elements on your path to progress.

In your matrix addressing the physical portion of your game, create a heading for footwork, timing & arm-swing, balance & posture, and the release & finish position.  Four headings with three elements under each heading such as tempo, direction, distance of steps as example, for a total of perhaps twelve components essential to keeping your game in top shape can be practiced for about 5 minutes per element, or for one hour in total, to get the most out of your physical game practice session.  Of course, you can modify the time spent on each element per practice session but it is important to rehearse each element key to your overall improvement in each heading in your matrix each time you practice.

Practice your strength, not your weakness!  Practice doing it right, not replicate what you have done incorrectly in the past!  Practice in regularly spaced intervals or days of the week as to train the memory of the muscles in your body to repeat automatically.  Plan your work and work your plan!

In your matrix or bowling outline for success, include a section for equipment.  It is of importance to practice with your bowling balls on a given lane condition and calibrate the ball motion of each ball in comparison to one another.  It is vital to understand your equipment and when and where each ball best matches to your game and to the conditions.  Try and understand how length potential ratings on each ball react in comparison to one another.  Compare the hook potential ratings of each ball.  Learn how best to match your bowling balls to the break point on the lane and when to change equipment prior to or during given sessions in competition.

Practicing with various bowling balls should also entail changing the coverstock preparations and compare one ball to another.  Using a variety of grit pads on a high-speed spinner will help you understand when to alter the surface of each given bowling ball to best match to conditions you frequently encounter in competition.  Practice with non-polished surfaces and with polished surfaces.  Polishes may be applied to ball surfaces with low grit and textured preparations under the polish or with a fine grit preparation under the polish.  Compare each ball to other balls in your arsenal until you have a thorough understanding of how each ball will react on given conditions.

This process of structuring your equipment in a similar manner as structuring elements of your physical game will lead to a complete and meaningful practice session and to getting desired results in competition.  It is remarkable how many highly skilled players have no established or organized practice regime or routine and eventually peak in their performances without ever rising above where they have landed.  Skilled players who make the leap to the next level are those who practice with the end in mind, have a plan of action, practice with discipline, and develop an arsenal which utilizes budgeting restrictions most efficiently.

Finally, add lane adjustments and alignment techniques to your matrix.  Practice playing angles on the lane which you will eventually encounter in competition in addition to your favorite angles.  Practice making a series of "parallel adjustments" which require adjusting your feet alignment and your eye alignment at the on-lane target and move across the practice lane in both directions as to better familiarize yourself with playing angles not comfortable to your eye.  A good goal is to make certain there is no angle targeting the break point with which you are unfamiliar.

If you practice the areas of your game where you are strongest and areas where you need improvement, then the "pieces of the success puzzle" begin to fall into place.  We hope these tips help and encourage you to develop your own "practice plan of action?"
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2011 11:47 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Ball Terminology

There are a few important keys pertaining to bowling ball terminology every skilled bowler should take time to become familiar with and gaining a working level of knowledge. In considering a few terms relating to bowling balls, RG, Differential of RG, Track Flare Potential, Hook Potential and Length Potential are likely the most useful terms to almost any bowler because they relate to a bowling ball in motion rather than at static rest.

Radius of Gyration (RG) in layman's terms refers to how quickly a bowling ball gets into its strongest rolling pattern as it travels down the lane. A low RG ball, as example, will roll strongest on the front end of the lane and usually is best suited for heavy oil conditions and with an aggressive coverstock. A Medium RG ball rolls strongest in the mid-lane conserving energy on the front end of the lane and is suited best on medium heavy oil conditions or when you need your ball to pick up a strong roll entering the break point area on the lane. A High RG ball is one which develops a strong roll on the back end of the lane, conserving energy as it travels, and usually matches best on a dry lane. A High RG ball, one with a stiff or pearl coverstock, works well with dry front-end conditions where you must prevent the ball from rolling too quickly and hooking in a non-predictable manner.

The Differential of RG is the reference to the bowling ball's reaction at the break point on the lane to the pocket on the back end of the lane. Low Differential balls, will produce a very controllable and modest hook on the back end of the lane, Medium Differential balls will hook more pronounced hook than a Low Differential ball, and the High Differential balls will hook most sharply from the break point to the pocket.

Since the oil pattern (cross lane and down lane ratios of oil applications) on any given lane determines the break point on the lane, a good idea for any bowler is to try and match the break point on the lane with the break point of the bowling ball created by RG and Differential ratings. The objective is to match the ball to the lane condition and that process involves matching the coverstock preparation as well as bowling ball RG and Differential ratings.

Length Potential is the general description of a bowling ball which involves the RG factor and the coverstock factor which together govern the skid length a bowling ball possesses as it travels down lane. Hook Potential is the term used to describe the bowling ball's ability to hook on the back end of the lane and involves the differential rating and the coverstock factor of a given bowling ball. Length Potential and Hook Potential ratings are commonly used by manufacturer's to describe the ball motion capabilities a given bowling ball is designed to achieve. Of course, the drilling layouts also influence the ball motion and that is something which needs to be addressed with the pro shop before planning a layout strategy.

There are, of course, many other bowling ball terms which might be useful if you have an affinity to learn what pro shop operators must know regarding the process of mapping drilling patterns and in drilling bowling balls. If you have a good relationship with a pro shop, then placing more emphasis on the everyday terms described above is probably best to know. Let your pro shop operator study the science of bowling balls while you study the science of identifying the ball motion which best serves your needs matching to lane conditions you most frequently encounter.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 06, 2011 2:52 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Remove Oil From A Bowling Ball


If you wish to identify the techniques in how to remove oil from a bowling ball is fairly easy if you give a little thought these options:

   1. Pro Shop Services
   2. Personal Use of Cleaning Agents
   3. When Best to Clean Your Ball


You can learn methods of how to remove oil from a bowling ball but first you must make note of our highest recommended option which is to use the services of your local pro shops. Pro shops are equipped with high speed ball spinners and varying grits of Abralon or other screening pads. The pro shops have all of the needed accessories to get the job completed properly.

By using a high-speed spinner, it is easy to prepare the surface of your bowling ball with water and screening pads of varying grit as to screen the ball surface to any desired texture. During the process, the ball surface will become heated through the friction applied by use of the revolving spinner and thereby open the pores of the ball. Use of low grit pads will open the pores of the ball and assist in clearing oil saturated into the coverstock more quickly and thoroughly than by use of high grit pads.

While the pores of the ball are open, use of cleaning agents will then absorb the oil and dirt out of the ball coverstock and then any final surface preparations may be applied. You can certainly screen a fine pad on the ball surface which has been screened with a low grit pad used during the cleaning process. Once oil is removed from your bowling ball, you should choose the best surface preparation to match with the lane conditions you are planning to encounter.

Knowing which surface options will best suit your needs comes from experimentation. Please do not expect the pro shop operator to have every answer but rather take some responsibility yourself to learn which surface preparations get the job done for your needs.

Another feature many pro shops offer is a machine which virtually bakes the oil from the coverstock pores of bowling balls. This machine will clear saturated oil in the ball coverstock and then the ball can be screened on the spinner to add any desired surface texture or grit finish followed by any final finishing techniques you desire. Normally, this bake process is not needed nearly as frequently as is a general surface preparation provided by the ball spinners, pads, and cleaning and polishing agents.

Anyone wishing to own their own high-speed spinner and accessories such as grit pads, polishes, and any other tools to maintain their bowling ball surfaces can do so in the comfort of their home. In time and with a little practice, you will learn viable resurfacing techniques on the ball spinner and be able to prepare your equipment for lane conditions in league play, tournaments, or any other competitions you choose. It has become very popular in recent years to own your own private ball spinner and become an expert at preparing your equipment for competition.

Cleaning bowling balls yourself is easier now than ever. Simply purchasing personal squeeze bottles of ball cleaner substances available in pro shops, or very inexpensively here at our site, will provide the right agents to clean your ball by hand. We recommend purchasing one of our microfiber towels and liquid ball cleaner so you can keep the surface of your ball clean and ready for use. The microfiber towels absorb oil seven times more moisture than linen towels and are great for wiping away lane oil off of your ball surface during your session on the lanes. Also microfiber towels are great for cleaning your ball bowling surface by using cleaner substances after your session is completed and for cleaning off rubber markings from the pit cushions in the pinsetters or from the belts on ball return units.

It is recommended to clean the surface of your ball by hand immediately after bowling when the pores in the coverstock of the ball are open due to the friction generated by the ball traveling down the lane. There are, however, liquid cleaning agents approved for use by U.S.B.C. (United States Bowling Congress) during competition. You now have the option of cleaning your ball with a towel and a cleaner while you are bowling. Why not take advantage of these options so you may prepare your equipment to best match the lane conditions you most commonly encounter?


Self-cleaning your bowling ball surface and perhaps even adding some polish to the surface after you complete your session on the lanes will buy you time before the need in getting back to the pro shop occurs. Re-screening the surface of your bowling ball on the high speed ball spinner to restore your ball surface is always the best course of action.
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benny
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:10 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Identify Bowling Pin Formations

If you are learning how to identify bowling pin formations, then beginning with information about pin locations on the pin deck will be helpful. The pin deck is the portion of the lane at the back end of the lane where the pinsetter sets pins for each new frame of bowling. The triangular formation of the pins is established by the location of the pin spots on the pin deck. Pin spots are round and match the base of a standard United States Bowling Congress certified bowling pin.

Since there are ten pins set each time the pinsetter recycles a frame of bowling, the pins are, therefore, best referred to by an identifying number. The pin nearest you when all ten pins are standing is commonly referred to as the "Head Pin" and is also known as the "No. 1 pin". Since a lane is typically about 39 boards across the lane in width and since the center board is referred to as the "20 Board", the center of the Head Pin is spotted directly on the twenty board, or in the exact center of the lane. The Head Pin is the first of four rows of pins configuring the triangular formation of pins and is by itself in the first row of pins.


The next row back from the foul line is the second row of pins. The second row of pins are identified by the "No. 2 Pin" and the "No. 3 Pin" from bowler's left to right. The center of the No. 2 Pin is located five board left of the head pin and directly spotted on the "25 board" of the lane, if you count boards from right to left at the foul line. The center of the No. 3 Pin is located five boards to the right of the head pin on the "15 Board", if you count boards from right to left at the foul line. The center of each pin spot for the No. 2 Pin and the No. 3 Pin are 12 inches diagonally from the Head Pin spot on the pin deck. The centers of the the No. 2 Pin and the No. 3 Pin are eleven boards apart and are directly positioned across from one another the same distance from the end of the pin deck.

The third row of pins are positioned behind the second row of pins and are are numbered as the "No. 4 Pin", the "No. 5 Pin", and the "No. 6 Pin." In the third row of pins, the No. 5 Pin is aligned directly behind the Head Pin in the first row of pins. When a pin is aligned directly behind another pin and is difficult to see when viewing the entire pin formation from the center portion of the foul line, the pin directly behind another pin, such as the No. 5 Pin is behind the Head Pin, is commonly referred to as a "Sleeper" pin.

The No. 4 Pin is positioned and centered on the pin deck located in the third row of pins and on the "30 Board" of the lane, if you are counting from bowler's right to left, and is 12 inches diagonally behind the No. 2 Pin in second row of pins. The No. 5 Pin is located on the "20 Board" in the third row of pins, same as the Head Pin and directly behind the Head Pin on the 20 Board of the lane. The No. 6 Pin is positioned and centered on the "10 Board" of the lane in the third row of pins, if you are counting from bowler's right to left at the foul line, and is 12 inches diagonally from the No. 3 Pin.

The fourth row of pins contains four total pins in the formation. The "No. 7 Pin" is located to the far left of the formation from the foul line and is positioned directly on the "35 Board" of the lane and is diagonally positioned 12 inches behind the No. 4 Pin in the third row of pins. The "No. 8 Pin" is positioned on the "25 Board" of the lane directly behind the No. 2 Pin located in the second row of pins. The No. 8 Pin is another "Sleeper" pin in the formation, as is the No. 9 Pin. The "No. 9 Pin" is located in the fourth row of pins and is positioned on the "15 Board" of the lane and directly behind the No. 3 Pin located in the second row of pins. The "No. 10 Pin" is positioned diagonally 12 inches behind the No. 6 Pin and is located on the No. 5 Board of the lane, if you count from bowler's right to left at the foul line.

Keep in mind the width of one board on the lane is about one inch wide, close enough for discussion purposes. Although some pins such as the No. 7 Pin or the No. 10 Pin appear to be positioned on the edge of the lane, the pin spots are centered five boards from the lane edges on both sides of the pin deck. Since the lane is about 60 feet from the foul line to the Head Pin, the pins will appear to the bowler closer to one another than they actually are positioned.

It helps to understand that the diameter of a bowling ball is just about nine inches wide across at the ball center. If two pins remain standing in the same row, such as the No. 2 Pin and No. 3 Pin in the second row of pins, it is possible for the ball to contact both pins and knock them over if the pins are in front of the No. 2 and No. 3 pins, such as the Head Pin is not standing. If the No. 4 Pin and No. 5 Pin in the third row of pins remain standing with no other pins are left standing in the first or second rows of pins,the bowling ball can contact both pins is arriving in a centered position at contact and knock over both the No. 4 and No. 5 pins. The same holds true for an example of the No. 5 and No. 6 pins of the third row of pins and for examples in the back row of pins for the combination of the No. 7 and No. 8 pins, the No. 8 and No. 9 pins, and the No. 9 and the No. 10 pins, all positioned in the fourth row of pins.

The pin combination where the ball can contact both pins in the same row of pins and knock them over are known as a "Split" combination. Of course, "Splits" may also be pins remaining standing which are located farther apart or not in the same row of pins than the previous example such as the No. 7 and No. 10 pin, the "Split" with two pins being the farthest apart of any possible combination of pins. There are several other "Split" combination of pins possible and all multiple pin combination leaves, by the way, are known as a "Spare" combination. A "Spare" is defined as a pin or pins remaining standing after the first ball delivery of any given frame of bowling.

Understanding how to identify bowling pin formations will help you learn to align yourself for strike ball deliveries, for spare combination deliveries, and to set overall strategies for lane adjustments for strikes and for spares. We hope this information helps you become more knowledgeable about "Ten Pin" bowling pin formations!
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benny
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 10, 2011 1:01 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Improve Your Practice Bowling Sessions

It is amazing how advanced bowlers will practice without any game plan or without any useful practice structure or purpose. If you wish to learn how to improve your practice bowling sessions and get the most from your time spent on the practice lanes without wasting valuable money set aside for practice, then kindly consider the following keys to guide you in doing so:

   Develop a Practice Plan

   Physical Game

   Equipment

   4. Lane Play

Any successful coach or coaching school in the past and in the present always develop an organized process or structure by which students are guided to practice their bowling. The most successful players practice with the end in mind! Professional businessmen will not begin a new venture without a detailed business plan. Professional bowlers, those who compete regularly on the pro tours and make a living doing so, practice with an intent to focus on specific areas of the game to maximize in an organized fashion to benefit from the time spent on the practice lane. Why not you?

If you are among those who have not developed a specific structure by which to practice, an outline with keys to working on important components of your game, then we highly recommend you do so right away. Prepare your own checklist containing a simple outline of the physical components of your game, include your bowling equipment, and finally include in the outline your routine for lane alignment, targeting, and lane adjustments so you are able to rehearse these important keys to your game on the lanes and away from competition. You can develop one larger outline containing all key headings or one per heading on four separate outlines to be used at various practice sessions. An organized structure is one way in learning how to improve your practice bowling sessions and is an integral key to sharpening your overall skills.

You can easily spend time working on your outline, if you will, and spend a dedicated amount of time during each practice session on each sub-element in the outline. As example, when working on physical game elements, develop perhaps four keys to your game and spend about 10-15 minutes per key element working on specifics techniques your coach has suggested to strengthen those elements on your path to progress.

In your physical game outline, create a heading for "footwork", "timing & arm-swing", "balance & posture", and the "release & finish position". Four headings with three elements under each heading such as "tempo", "direction", and "length of steps" under the "footwork" heading, as example, for a total of perhaps twelve total components included with the four headings essential to keeping your game in top shape is highly recommended. Each component in all four headings could, as another example, can be practiced for about 5 minutes per component, or for one hour in total, to get the most out of your physical game skill-drills during your practice session. Of course, you can modify the time spent on each component per practice session but it is important to rehearse each component key to your overall improvement in each heading of your outline each time you practice!

Practice your strength, not your weakness! Practice doing it right, not replicate what you have done incorrectly in the past! Practice in regularly spaced intervals or days of the week as to train the memory of the muscles in your body to repeat automatically. It is, of course, always a great idea to work with a certified U.S.B.C. coach in your local area or with a skilled and experienced pro shop operator or with a local bowling professional with a good reputation for coaching. The cost of professional instruction is far less than the cost of bowling balls, in most cases. Why not invest in your bowling future, develop a practice plan with your coach, then work on the components of your plan or outline when you spend time on the practice lane?

Your bowling outline for success should also include a section for equipment. It is of importance to practice with all or most all of your bowling balls on a given lane condition and calibrate or compare the ball motion of each ball to one another. It is vital to understand your equipment and when and where each ball best matches to your game and to the lane conditions. Try and understand how length potential ratings on each ball react in comparison to one another. Compare the hook potential ratings of each ball. Learn how best to match your bowling balls to the break point on the lane and when to change equipment prior to or during given sessions in competition.

Practicing with various bowling balls should also entail changing the coverstock preparations and compare one ball to another. Using a variety of grit pads on a high-speed spinner will help you understand when to alter the surface of each given bowling ball to best match to conditions you frequently encounter in competition. Practice with non-polished surfaces and with polished surfaces. Polishes may be applied to ball surfaces with a low grit and textured preparation under the polish or with a fine grit preparation under the polish. Compare each ball to other balls in your arsenal until you have a thorough understanding of how each ball will react on given conditions.

The same reasoning holds true with layout patterns. Try and understand how various drill patterns affect your ball motion and recognize when to switch bowling balls during competition. This process of structuring your equipment in a similar manner as structuring components of your physical game will lead to a complete and meaningful practice session and to getting desired results in competition.

Finally, add lane adjustments and alignment techniques to your outline. Practice playing angles on the lane which you will eventually encounter in competition in addition to playing your favorite or most natural angles. Practice making a series of "parallel adjustments" which require adjusting your feet alignment and your eye alignment at the on-lane target and move across the practice lane in both directions as to better familiarize yourself with playing angles not comfortable to your eye. A good goal is to make certain there is no angle targeting the break point with which you are unfamiliar.

If you practice the areas of your game where you are strongest and work to eliminate areas where you need improvement, then the "pieces of the success puzzle" begin to fall into place. We hope these tips help and encourage you to develop your own "practice plan of action."
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benny
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2011 3:39 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Develop A Good Bowling Ball Arsenal

If you are a highly experienced and talented player, you probably would like to learn how to develop a good bowling ball arsenal built around one or two of your favorite pieces of equipment? Kindly give thought to three important strategies regarding future bowling ball selections:

   Choosing Specific Length & Hook Potential
   Choosing A Coverstock Preparation
   Choosing Layout Patterns

In recent years the leading manufacturers such as Storm, Hammer, Ebonite, Roto Grip and Brunswick, and others have placed great emphasis on developing well balanced lines of top performance bowling balls. You can determine how to develop a good bowling ball arsenal by adding one or more of these fine products to your personal equipment inventory by selecting bowling balls which enhance the range of performance you currently own.

First, it is important to understand that bowling ball length potential is essentially derived from the core design (RG range) of a given ball coupled with specific coverstocks (aggressive to non-aggressive ranges). As example, Owning a ball with a low RG and an extremely aggressive coverstock works best in heavy oil because the ball will read the lane very quickly and pick up a strong roll as it enters the mid-lane. Make sure you have at least one ball set-up for heavy oil conditions. Aggressive coverstocks prevent over-skid and enable you to combat very heavy oil conditions. For heavy oil and a strong back-end reaction, use a low RG ball with a high differential rating.The opposite holds true for dry lane conditions.

Using a ball with a stiff or pearl coverstock coupled with a high RG and a long length potential rating matches best for very dry lanes. Make sure you have one ball set-up for dry lane conditions. If you are seeking a ball to recover sharply from the break point to the pocket on dry lanes, a high Differential of RG rated ball will work best. Also on dry lanes, you may use a high RG ball with a low differential rating, a lesser hook potential combination, which will works best when you do not wish for the ball to react abruptly at the break point but rather react smoothly with no sudden pull toward the pocket.

Of course, a medium RG ball with a medium rated differential is a great choice to read any lane condition and will always give you a dependable ball reaction. When you need your ball to read the mid-lane well and arc smoothly and continuously from the break point to the pocket, make sure you own a medium RG ball with a medium to a high differential rating.

Now you have three bowling balls with which to match with heavy oil, medium oil, and dry conditions. Next, choose spare ball to round out a four ball arsenal. If you prefer to use a polyester or a mild reacting urethane ball to roll at corner pin spares, then make sure you have one in your bowling bag. Why risk missing a corner pin spare carelessly because the ball reacts too abruptly when reaching the dry back ends of the lanes? Why have to throw the ball much faster than you can realistically control just to convert a corner pin spare? Own a spare ball.

With the bases covered with a four ball arsenal, you may next add a ball(s) which will fit between existing ball reactions. Finding the right ball to mix well with your other equipment can be tricky, however. Many top players choose to remain with the same bowling ball manufacturer so they can compare both hook potential ratings and length potential ratings and not duplicate a ball and a reaction which they already own. This is certainly the case with the pro bowlers we see on television, most all of whom are under contract with a manufacturer to use a specific brand of equipment. The strategy of remaining with the same manufacturer can be effective.

Matching the surface texture and layout pattern for a given ball and using the right choice in length and hook potential ratings is the objective. Research the bowling ball technical data provided by the manufacturers to give yourself a good chance at selecting the best next ball.

Most top players today own six or eight, or perhaps even a greater number, of bowling balls. An eight ball arsenal is an excellent strategy because it will allow you to have balls for the extreme oil conditions ready for use and also have balls set-up for conditions less extreme.

Make sure you develop a surface preparation strategy so your equipment is ready to match to known lane conditions when needed. Experimentation is necessary to achieve the right surface strategies which work best for your game. The drill pattern and the length and hook potential ratings a given ball possesses are not enough by themselves. You must make sure you experiment with ball surface strategies as well.

Consult the manufacturer's recommended drilling patterns before arbitrarily drilling your new bowling ball. One layout pattern for a high-rev player will not necessarily produce the desired ball motion for a player with less rev-rate. Begin with the end in mind. Choose a layout pattern which matches best to your rev-rate and produces the length and hook potential influencing factors you seek for given lane conditions.

The science involved in developing an effective bowling ball arsenal is greater now than ever. Do not be lazy, do your research before investing in your next bowling ball so your money is spent wisely.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 13, 2011 2:44 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Use Bowling Tape

Learning how to use bowling tape is fairly easy. Bowling tape is a great accessory choice to keep in your bag for those times when your bowling fingers or thumb shrink during your session on the lanes or prior to bowling and when you want to restore the proper grip following your previous session on the lanes.

How to use bowling tape begins by simply inserting a piece of pre-cut tape in your thumb hole, as example, about an eighth of an inch below the surface of the ball with the rounded edge upward. The tape may be inserted by use of scissors or a small knife blade, both of which may be stored in your accessory pouch, supporting one piece of tape on the tip of the blade. Curve the tape slightly into the contour of the inside of the hole as to make it easy to insert the blade with the tape down into the hole and down to the desired depth. The tape should be inserted slightly below the top edge of the hole to prevent the tape from pulling up and fraying over the hole edge while you bowl.

It is recommended to place the tape either where the flat part of your thumb grips the ball, or where your thumb sits in the hole directly behind the back of your thumb. Both locations will eliminate the loose feeling in the thumb hole when gripping the ball and prevent you from squeezing the ball with your thumb unnecessarily while trying to gain a good grip.

It is recommended to use a textured tape where your thumb grips the ball to improve gripping action. To release the ball quickly, fill the looseness inside the hole with a piece of a smooth surface tape which also helps to avoid skin irritation as your hand exits the ball.

Using a smooth surface tape placed behind the thumb in the hole will help prevent skin irritation on the back knuckle area of your thumb while also serving the primary purpose of filling the looseness of the hole. Bowlers who constantly use skin patch substances should consider using smooth surface tape behind the thumb near the irritated area of skin and reduce the amount of skin drag as the ball is released. Of course, placing smooth tape in the gripping portion inside your thumb hole will help you exit the ball quickly with little thumb drag at the critical moment of release.

The use of multiple pieces of tape is a common practice by layering the pieces on top of one another until a sufficient number of pieces are inserted. Some pieces of tape are manufactured with a greater thickness than other brands and require fewer pieces layered in a very loose thumb or finger hole. To state the obvious, removing a piece of tape when your hand expands from the friction created by bowling will help you to release the ball cleanly and on time.

In the case of balls drilled with finger tip grips, the use of bowling tape may be inserted into the holes as a space filler regardless of use of inserts or not. The tape may be inserted in either the front or back of the finger holes, as preferred, to tighten the hole slightly for better finger releasing action. It is another common practice to cut the tape to a shorter length as to fit easily into a finger hole, about an eighth of an inch below the top edge of the hole, because the finger tip grips are typically drilled with less depth than a thumb hole.

With some experimentation, you will learn precisely where placement of bowling tape in your finger and thumb holes works best for you. Cleaning the hole when preparing to replace old tape with new pieces may be done with any ball cleaner substance you carry in your accessory pouch. We hope these tips help.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 1:21 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Learn Bowling Ball Terms


How to learn bowling ball terms which are not publicly made readily available begins by reading through these excerpts and then by viewing a comprehensive list of terms. You may then review an alphabetized index of comprehensive terms to help you broaden your bowling vocabulary. Why not become familiarized with some of the bowling terminology commonly used throughout the world? Let's get started:

Angle of Entry – angle measured parallel to the boards of the lane and at which the bowling ball hits the pocket.

Axis of Rotation – an imaginary line perpendicular to the track along which a bowling ball rotates.

Axis Point – one of two points located on opposite poles marking the end points of the axis of rotation.

Axis Tilt – known as the angle of rotation of a bowling ball imparted by the bowler. Rotational positioning is critical in determining bowling ball hook potential.

Balance Hole – an extra hole drilled in a specific position in the bowling ball used to balance the ball statically and alter the overall reaction of the bowling ball.

Ball Track – the portion of the bowling ball which comes into contact with the lane surface as the ball rolls down the lane.

Break Point – the point on the lane where the bowling ball completes its transition from skid to traction and begins the hooking process. The break point usually exists from 5-7 feet past the final distance of oil conditioner application on the lane surface.

Core – the large inner portion of a bowling ball consisting of filler materials and of high density materials for dynamic control purposes.

Coverstock – the outer shell of a bowling ball constructed with a variety of materials, all polyurethane based products. These variations are commonly referred to as plastic or polyester, urethane, reactive resin, hybrid urethane, or particle urethane.

Differential of RG – the difference of the radius of gyration (RG) of a bowling ball’s “X axis” (weight block vertical) compared to RG of the “Y” or “Z” axes (the weight block horizontal). Differential is an indicator of a bowling ball’s flare potential. High Differential of RG, high track flare – low Differential of RG, low track flare. Length adjustments by use of certain drilling patterns is created by using bowling balls with various Differential ranges.

Flare Potential – the maximum amount a bowling ball can migrate while traveling down the lane. Flare Potential can be used as an indicator which bowling balls are best suited for oiling lanes (high flare) and which balls for dryer conditions (low flare).

Length – an evaluation of how far a ball will travel before it begins to hook.

Pin – a small factory plug that signifies the center of the weight block in most bowling balls.

Pin–In – a term used to describe a bowling ball pin location 1” (one inch) or less from the CG.

Pin-Out – indicates the weight block is not centered and the pin is 1 “ or more from CG.

Positive Axis Point (PAP) - the point on the pocket side of the ball at the end of the Axis of Rotation upon delivery of the bowling ball.

Radius of Gyration (RG) – an account of the location of the mass inside a bowling ball. RG tells whether the ball mass is toward the center of the ball (low RG), toward the cover (High RG), or between (medium RG). Low RG balls rev-up quickly, medium RG balls slightly later, and high RG balls lope down the lane conserving energy until later.

Skid-Flip – refers to a ball reaction on the front end of a lane and an excessive backend reaction with increased entry angle.

Weight Block – inner portion of a ball which influences ball motion based on its density and the Bowlers axis of Rotation.

We hope these terms help you expand your understanding of bowling ball terms heard in the pro shops and in bowling centers by highly experienced players. Perhaps these few terms will whet your appetite to learn more about bowling balls and take a proactive approach to the science of the game.
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