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SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING!
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benny
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:09 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Pick Up Bowling Splits


Learning how to pick up bowling splits is a small part of the game but one which can make a difference in improving your scores. The goal of all bowlers is to deliver your ball into the pocket and to get a strike or if a pin or pin combination known as a "spare" is left standing, then the goal becomes to convert the spare. Since no one strikes every delivery the likelihood that a split combination of pins will remain standing does exist and is a reality of the game. How to pick up bowling splits can be accomplished by understanding more about pin combination leaves known as "splits" and how to give yourself the best chances in converting the split (a split is also a spare, of course).

In the second row of pins, the 2-3 pin combination is extremely rare but is possible to leave standing. The 2-3 pin leave is known as a split and can be converted by rolling the bowling ball into the exact middle of the two pins as to contact both pins with your bowling ball at virtually the same time. Normally, an adjustment from your strike line will be between 3-5 boards to the right using the same target on the lane for your strike delivery if you are a right handed bowler, which is a commonly used system, but not the only method to convert the 2-3 split. Of course, the 2-3 split is very, very uncommon but the strategy for adjusting is an important key in converting similar splits.

It is important to note that by using the same strike line target and adjusting your feet laterally to the right for this spare since the head pin is located on the 20 board and the pocket on 17.5 board, then about 3 boards to the right is the most likely adjustment. In cases with extreme amounts of lane oil in the center of the lane which causes excessive ball skid, however, an adjustment of 4 or perhaps 5 boards might be needed while still using the same strike line target so you will get the same ball motion toward the split as you do toward the pocket on your first ball delivery. This same adjustment actually works well for the "bucket" spare, the 2-4-5 or the 2-4-5-8 pin combination spares.

By the way, for the sake of simplicity, all references to adjustments for splits in this article will address the right handed bowler. The opposite adjustment will hold true for the left handed bowler.

In the third row of pins exists the 4-5 pin split and the 5-6 pin split. Normally, the 4-5 pin split will occur for a right handed bowler while the 5-6 pin split is a left handed bowler combination. Moving to the right for the 4-5 pin split from 7-10 boards on the approach with your feet and using the same strike line target on the lane is a continuation of a commonly used system for converting the 4-5 pin split. The more oil in the center of the lane, the greater the number of boards are needed to adjust to give yourself the best chances at converting this split. The less amount of oil in the middle of the lane as is the case on very dry lanes, then adjusting a fewer number of boards to the right from your strike alignment positioning will give you the best chance at converting this spare.

In the back row of pins are the same type of split leaves known as the 7-8 pin combination, the 8-9 pin combination (almost never will you leave the 2-3 pin nor the 8-9 pin combination), and the 9-10 pin combination. For the 7-8 pin split, adjust your feet to the right from your strike alignment 11-14 boards and use your same strike line target on the lane so you get the same dependable reaction when the ball travels down the lane toward the 7-8 pin split as you do for a strike delivery.

For the 9-10 pin split, use your 6 pin adjustment from your spare system strategy (perhaps the 3rd or 4th arrows on the lane) and perhaps even use a spare ball which does not hook as much as your strike ball because the back end of the lane is very dry and it is dangerous to try and hook your ball excessively when rolling for right side of the lane spares and splits. Usually, shooting for the 9-10 pin splits requires moving left and delivering your ball across the lane passing through on or about the 20 board or center arrow on it way down to the 9-10 pin split.

Another most frequent split combination is the "baby split" or the 3-10 pin combination. The strategy is to contact the 3 pin on the extreme right side of the pin with your ball so the ball deflects into the 10 pin and you convert the split. Using approximately the same adjustment for the 9-10 pin split can work for the 3-10 pin split because in both cases your ball needs to pass across the 6 pin spot on the pin deck in order to contact both pins and convert the split. An adjustment to the left with your feet across the approach as you would roll for a six pin spare or perhaps a 6-10 pin spare is fairly close to the needed adjustment with, perhaps, 2 boards less adjustment to the left on the approach. Use the same target on the lane as called for in your spare system for the 6 pin or the 6-10 pin spare combination.

The 5-7 split requires an adjustment to the left on the approach and since you need to have the ball contact the 5 pin barely on the far right portion of the pin as to slide the pin into the 7 pin, your adjustment to the left on the approach should be 3-5 boards and continue to use your strike line target on the lane. Moving left on the approach will cause the oil in the middle of the lane to skid your ball far enough to still contact the 5 pin but not squarely as is the case on a strike line delivery.

The 4-9 pin split requires an approximate adjustment as for converting the 7 pin spare as to contact the 4 pin on its far left side of the pin to slide the pin into the 9 pin. Moving your feet anywhere from 11-14 boards to the right on the approach and using the same strike line delivery will give you a good chance to convert this split.

To convert the 4-10 split, the same alignment plus perhaps 1 or 2 additional boards adjustment from the 4-9 split adjustment to the right on the approach and using the same strike line on the lane is the strategy. To convert the 6-7 split, use your 10 pin alignment with perhaps an additional 1 or 2 boards adjustment to the left on the approach with your feet and use your 10 pin target on the lane from your spare shooting strategy so you have some chance of barely contacting the 6 pin with the ball and sliding it over to the 7 pin. Since a greater angle to slide the 4 pin or 6 pin over the the 7 and 10 pins respectively for these splits is required in comparison to converting the 4-9 or 6-8 splits, the chances of converting these larger apart pin location splits is reduced considerably.

To convert the 7-10 split, the 4-6 split, the 8-10 split, or the 7-9 split requires an extremely fortunate ball positioning when contacting either pin in the split combination as to barely topple the pin over, bounce the pin on the deck until it walks itself over to knock down the other pin. These spare combination splits are rare to convert and are more generally picked up by contact on one of the key pins in the split combination and getting a lucky bounce out of the pit and back onto the lane to contact the remaining pin or pins.

One certain strategy for every pin combination on any split you might leave after delivering your strike ball is to make sure to knock down something and not deliver the ball to miss contact at least one pin. Hit something - no air balls please!!

The "washout" leave is generally not referred to as a split but requires similar strategies to convert. To convert the 1-2-10 pin "washout" leave requires adjusting about 5 or 6 boards to the right on the approach (remember, right handed bowlers) and using the same strike line target on the lane as to deflect the head pin across and to the right and contact the 10 pin. The washout is converted fairly regularly compared to many split combination of pins.

Splits are very difficult spares. There are systems using a spare ball and using the same target near the center of the lane which we might see Pro Bowlers using on TV, as example, but require a good deal of practice and do not utilize the oil ratios applied to the lanes by the lane machines as commonly found in most house-conditions at local bowling centers. Unless you are well practiced at systems to convert splits which do not involve use of your strike target line and ten pin or 7 pin spare lines, then we suggest using the strike line delivery system the examples given in this article refer to and encourage.

Develop a system of strike alignment and one for spare alignment before a system for for splits. Using your eyes, your imagination, and controlling your ball speed are keys to converting splits. Generally speaking the best spare shooters are also the best split shooters. So - become a good spare shooter and learn to make good strike line adjustments. Also and importantly, you must walk your lines when delivering your bowling ball toward any off-center pin combination. It is shocking how many bowlers drift off-line when walking to the foul line thereby reducing the impact and effectiveness of making good adjustments for spares or for splits. Practice walking your lines from any location on the approach!

The process of alignment and converting spares and splits is very geometric and matches nicely with use of the bowling arrows, the break point, and ultimately, the pocket.
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benny
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 16, 2011 12:43 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Make Bowling Release Adjustments


If you wish to learn how to make bowling release adjustments, it is important to first develop one very good and reliable release as the foundation for your game. It is no secret that many coaches will recommend that you use one reliable release and make other adjustments for changing or varying lane conditions. Your prime release must always be the one which you are the most accurate of all releases and where you can repeat good deliveries over and over again. Other adjustments include, of course, bowling ball changes, speed adjustments, angle adjustments, and loft adjustments to name some variables which can be implemented when a ball reaction change is needed.

By understanding how to make bowling release adjustments, you add variables to your game to overcome changing lane conditions. First, it is very critical for you to not only learn a couple of release variations to round out your game but to also understand that it is vital to practice and commit to getting proficient at developing variations to your prime release technique. Only one way to get good at changing your release and that is practice. You must work hard at maintaining an effective arm swing so changing releases does not adversely affect good and consistent shot-making. After all, why change releases if you are not good at controlling the direction and speed of the bowling ball when trying to use a release other than your prime release? Practice is the key.

OK, when your bowling ball exits your hand at the “moment of release” between the back of your slide shoe and the laces of the shoe, allow your hand to continue moving toward your target down lane following the ball path. Ideally, the front part of your bowling arm (where blood is normally drawn in a laboratory) should be facing the pins at the “moment of release.” Use this technique for every type of hand action adjustment you make. Keep the inside edge of your bowling elbow near your body on the forward swing and prevent the elbow from rotating away from your body and outside of the bowling ball before your hand enters the release zone.

Do not rotate the entire arm, only rotate your hand action when trying to tilt the axis and create a higher rev-rate and develop increased power. On your prime release, your bowling fingers should rotate slightly after your thumb exits the ball without the entire arm rotating. The bowling fingers should rotate perhaps two hours on a clock dial, from six to four o’clock for example, if you are a right handed bowler, so you will create enough bowling ball axis tilt to produce a positive hooking motion. If you master two other releases other than your prime release, you can also use intermediate release techniques between full power and prime release techniques and therefore develop several variations to your prime release. Adding power and limiting power are the two release adjustments you must first develop to augment your prime release so you create a wider range of adjustments to compensate for changing lane conditions.

To increase the hook potential and add power by changing your release, you can rotate your hand further behind the ball to perhaps at seven o' clock or a 7:30 position on a clock dial and maintain this position throughout the entire forward swing motion and until your ball reaches the release zone before rotating your bowling fingers to a finishing 4 o' clock position on the clock dial.

In this example, your fingers will rotate a full three hours or perhaps four hours on the clock dial in a quick and decisive motion and that type of rotation on the bowling ball will impart sufficient axis tilt to increase your rev-rate and the hook potential of the ball on the back end of the lane. This type of release action should match best with oily lane conditions when you need your ball to recover on the back end of the lane and hook sharply to the pocket.

Of course, it goes without saying that any release change may also necessitate a swing angle change to match the desired path the ball must follow as it travels down the lane to the break point. Make sure you understand how important it is to match the swing direction with the power output you generate by changing your release from your prime release position. When adding power to your release, your angle of delivery should normally promote a pronounced inside-out swing path so the ball has increased angle to the break point compared to your prime release delivery angle. When limiting the power of your release for dry lanes, you want to make sure your swing path is aligned with a more direct angle down the lane than your power release swing angles.

You may also experiment with tilting your wrist forward slightly when gripping the ball for releases generating increased power. A tilted forward hand position entering the release zone will fire your thumb out of the bowling ball more quickly than a straight wrist position or a negative tilt wrist position encourage. Be careful to not rotate your hand too soon when using a forward tilted wrist position because an early hand rotation will become an ineffective release and usually promotes a weak rolling action on the ball and a poor directional control toward your target.

If you wish to reduce the power of your prime release for very dry lane conditions, then allow your fingers and thumb to flow smoothly out of the ball and about the same time but with your thumb existing the ball slightly before your fingers exit the ball. You can encourage this type of release by using a five o' clock to four o' clock finger rotation with a straight wrist position or a slightly reverse wrist tilted position as your hand enters the release zone. Limiting the rotation of your fingers will produce a very effective forward roll with less axis tilt than a release using more finger rotation on the ball. Less axis tilt will result in less hook potential down the lane.

The quickest method of changing your release whether you are searching for more power or less power than you prime release provides is to use a wrist support device to help regulate the "moment of release" no matter which technique you choose to implement. If you do not use an adjustable wrist support device to regulate your wrist tilt positioning, then make sure you practice under the supervision of a certified coach to ensure you do not rotate your ball and your entire arm ineffectively when trying to impart more or less power to your release. Use of a good coach to help you master release adjustments is essential when you first work at making changes. Do not discount the importance of a good coach if you wish to advance your game.

Other useful tips are to please allow your hand to follow through in the same direction as the ball travels toward your target. Prevent your bowling hand from moving in a different direction than the ball is traveling regardless of your release technique. The elbow of your bowling arm should follow directly behind your hand so you avoid deliveries left or right of your target line. The forward-swing continuing motion after the release, known as the “follow-through”, should also maintain a target orientation. Hold your form until the ball passes the target. We hope these tips will help you improve your bowling release.
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benny
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 17, 2011 10:26 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Improve Converting Corner Pin Spares

Learning how to improve converting corner pin spares is a key component in raising your bowling score average. To effectively reduce the challenges related to trying to picking up corner pin spares, there are a few techniques you should develop. If you are a right handed bowler and wish to learn how to improve converting corner pin spares, begin with the 10 pin. Left handed bowlers should think oppositely and key first on the 7 pin spare.

Right handed bowlers should move to the far left side of the approach where the instep of your sliding shoe covers the 35 board on the approach, target the center arrow about fifteen feet past the foul line if you roll the ball fairly straight or if you use a bowling ball with a stiff coverstock which does not promote hook. If you hook the ball, site slightly right (right handed bowlers) of the center arrow, perhaps two or three boards to the right, and allow for the ball to hook slightly and still maintain its direction toward the spare. Be sure to slightly align your hips and bowling shoulder to face the corner pin and maintain that alignment as you walk to the foul line and make your delivery.

One very important key in success at converting corner pin spares (the ten pin for right handed bowlers or the seven pin for left handed bowlers) is to “walk your line” and do not drift excessively to the center of the approach. Drifting to the center of the approach will reduce an effective angle to the spare.

Drifting to the center of the approach causes the ball to miss to the inside of the spare because the ball path will encounter a higher friction portion of the lane as opposed to traveling through the center portion of the lane with the greatest amount of oil and will, therefore, be prone to hooking away from the 10 pin. Drifting also may cause the ball to fall into the channel and miss the 10 pin because of the release angle across the lane combined with using a reduced portion of the width of the lane. It is critical to never walk in front of your arm swing path so your swing is forced to realign around your hip or leg before releasing the ball. Learn to "walk your lines" and your shot-making will improve, particularly the corner pin spares.

The number one reason bowlers miss corner pin spares is because of drifting off of the desired target path created by the initial alignment on the approach. Your selected target on the lane is based upon where you stand on the approach and also relevant to where you slide at the foul line. Enough cannot be said about avoiding drifting away from your target line when lining up across the approach for any corner pin spare.

The other most common reason bowler’s miss corner pin spares is because of ball speed changes, usually trying to deliver the ball much faster than normal. Unless you practice rolling the ball at more than 20 mph and are proficient at doing so, then you are likely not going to be able to repeat good deliveries consistently and will miss the corner pin spares far too frequently.

Use a ball for spare shooting. Preferably, use a ball with shiny or stiff coverstock and drilled to not hook sharply at the back end of the lane. Trying to use an aggressive coverstock bowling ball and make it go straight is another technique which normally will not work well unless you are highly skilled at changing your release and trusting your ability to do so in competition. Use a spare ball which does not promote hook and deliver the ball toward the corner pin spares at your normal strike ball speed where you can maintain consistent speed control and accuracy.

One final tip is practice. It surprises coaches when bowlers struggling to improve their averages do not practice converting spares, particularly the corner pin spares which are most commonly missed by most bowlers. If you are struggling with the 10 pin spare, double check your alignment on the practice lane and then roll perhaps twenty consecutive deliveries toward the ten pin. Do not worry about how many pins are on the deck because you are in a practice mode and only should be concerned with targeting the 10 pin spare.

Once you can convert the 10 pin ten consecutive times, then practice the 7 pin spare. Make your adjustment to the other side of the approach, normally about 12-15 boards to the right of your strike alignment board on the approach, and roll the ball toward your strike target board while keeping your hips and bowling shoulder aligned with the 7 pin. Walk your lines and avoid drifting right or left on the approach. Of course, the opposite technique applies to left handed bowlers.

We hope these tips help. We highly recommend consulting a certified bowling coach in your area or a local bowling professional to help you with techniques to improve converting corner spares.
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 6:37 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Maintain Bowling Arm Swing Direction

The key components of an effective bowling arm swing are speed control and accuracy to your target. Tempo and direction have always been keys of successful arm swings so let's begin by learning how to maintain bowling arm swing direction.

By moving the ball held in front of your bowling shoulder in your stance position, regardless if you are holding the ball knee high, waist high, or shoulder level, outward and downward toward your target where you site on the lane, you will set the pace and the direction of your swing into motion. Try to sequence the beginning movement of the ball with the first step of a four step approach or slightly before the first step. Once the ball is in motion toward your target, seek a free, smooth, and uncontrolled back swing along your target path allowing the ball to reach shoulder level or higher directly behind your shoulder at the completion of the back swing.

If you are a right handed bowler, here is a quick method of determining how to maintain bowling arm swing direction. Stand upright with your feet together and arms hanging loosely by your sides. Raise your right arm upward with the palm of your hand facing the sky until your the bottom of your elbow is at least shoulder height. Your bowling arm and upper body create a 90 degree right angle relationship. Move your bowling arm slightly away from the center of your body an additional 5 or ten degrees and keep your arm extended fully with the palm of your hand facing the sky. Your bowling finders should be directly in front of the outside edge of your bowling shoulder.

Your bowling arm should now be extended fully at shoulder level or higher and the angle created between your shoulders and your arm is about 100 degrees. If you visualize your shoulders squared to the bowling pin deck and parallel to the foul line, then your arm will be pointed in the proper direction to release your ball toward your target down the lane allowing for necessary room so the ball can hook to the pocket on the back end of the lane.

If you use this relationship of arm and shoulders for playing any and all angles on the lanes, then you will develop a consistent arm swing direction. Notice how you can rotate your shoulders open slightly and still maintain the same approximate 100 degree angle relationship with your bowling arm swinging through your approach, delivery, and follow through motions. This shoulder alignment, which is slightly open in reference to the foul line, works nicely when you have to play an inside angle on the lane allowing for either dry land conditions, a large hooking motion of your bowling ball, or both.

When you need to start the ball on a straight path up the boards of the lane on very oily conditions before it begins to hook to the pocket, then close your shoulders back to a square position parallel to the foul line but still maintain the 100 degree angle between your shoulders and your arm swing path. Maintain the same swing path for all deliveries.

Regardless if you are rolling at a cross lane spare, playing a deep inside angle to the break point and then to the pocket, if you are playing an outside angle heading the delivery of your ball straight up the lane, or if you need to close your shoulders beyond parallel to roll your ball at pins in the opposite corner of the lane, merely open or close your shoulders relative to the foul line so your swing direction can maintain the same directional consistency no matter where you are sighting on the lane.

It helps to preset your hips and shoulder alignment in your stance position so the front of your bowling shoulder will face directly at your target and your arm swing will ultimately swing toward your down lane target. Try and maintain the same shoulder position throughout your walk to the foul line by avoiding excessive shoulder rotation during your swing so when you arrive at your final sliding step and begin to release your bowling ball, your forward swing and follow through motions will be target oriented.

Visualize aiming a pistol on a shooting range directly at your target and maintaining a right angle (or about 90 degrees of angle between your shoulders and your arm) with your shoulders and the arm holding the pistol. If you then wish to fire the weapon at a different target to the right of the first target, simply maintain the same relationship angle between your shoulders and your arm holding the pistol and re-position your shoulders accordingly. Use this same method of alignment angle between your shoulders and your arm swing on the lanes so you can develop a consistent swing direction from delivery to delivery and at any target on the lane.

Another tip about the forward swing is that the forward swing should move downward and under your shoulder arriving next to the ankle of your slide foot with about one inch of space or less to avoid hitting the ankle as your hand begins the releasing process. Ideally, the front part of your bowling arm (where blood is normally drawn in a laboratory) should be facing the pins at the moment of release.

The forward-swing continuing motion after the release, known as the follow-through, should also maintain a target orientation. The swing should follow-through high enough as to allow the elbow of your bowling arm to attain shoulder height or higher each and every delivery. These tips will help you produce an effective swing direction toward your target. With some practice, you can improve your swing direction and play multiple angles on the lane which is the secret to higher scores.

If you have any questions about swing direction techniques, we recommend you seek consultation with a certified bowling coach or with a top amateur/professional player in your area to work at improving the effectiveness of your arm swing
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 1:32 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Walk Your Bowling Lines For Power Players


Learning how to walk bowling lines for power players is an important key in matching good arm swing direction to your target down the lane. Good footwork for power players involves some important keys. Developing a good technique in how to walk lines for power players will help you maintain good swing alignment because of the influencing effects your body motion has on your swing path as you move to the foul line.

Right handed bowlers who hook the ball a great deal should walk from right to left. The opposite is true for left handed players but we will use the right handed player as our reference in this article.

The vast majority of professional bowlers walk to the left from their starting position on the approach because the swing will follow the direction the upper body moves and will align itself on an inside-out swing path and toward the target on the lane. Since the objective for any bowler who hooks the ball is to release the ball on an inside to outside swing path matching the target line to the break point down the lane, it makes sense to walk lines which encourage an inside to outside swing alignment.

Walking left on the approach will help you realign your bowling hand supporting the weight of the ball in motion from the top of the back swing to behind your new shoulder position automatically because of the lateral direction change of your upper body caused by walking to the left. This swing alignment path is the preferred path by bowling professionals and by coaches and is one we highly recommend for all players hooking the bowling ball.

A technique used by players who walk left with a consistent footwork pattern (for right handed players) using a 4 step approach and which encourages good balance is as follows:

1. The first step with the right foot moves straight ahead from it initial positioning on the approach and maintains consistent tempo and distance of the step from one delivery to the next.

2. The second step with the left foot steps to the left about 5 boards left of the initial positioning on the approach and maintains consistent tempo and distance from delivery to delivery.

3. The third step with the right foot steps in front of the second step in a tightrope fashion as to step on a line under the center line of the torso and maintains consistent tempo and distance each delivery.

4. The final slide step slides under the chin or the center line of the torso to support the weight of the body and create a stable and balanced platform in which to deliver the ball. The slide foot should enter the foul line in a fairly straight line so the toe of the sliding shoe faces the pocket down the lane.

The pattern of steps to walk to the left effectively, therefore, is "straight on one, left about 5 boards on two, step to the center line of the body on three, and slide under the center line of the body on four." Of course, if you use a five step approach, the first step is straight to get you into motion, then the remaining four steps follow the above described pattern.

Some tips to watch for in this footwork technique is to practice making the second step precisely stepping to the left each delivery the same number of boards, about 5 boards. We recommend 5 boards because it is not a difficult number of boards to walk to the left on the second step in a repeated manner and also will accommodate enough of a shift in upper body direction to the left so the arm swing can easily follow the body to the left and will re-align to the desired inside to outside swing path. When you walk left, it is easy to understand that the forward swing will not have to re-route itself around your right leg or right hip and can move on a delivery line along the down lane target path.

It helps to have a certified coach or a bowling professional available if you are trying to change your footwork pattern and walk right to left lines. A "spotter" with experience and knowledge of the technique you are trying to develop is valuable so you eliminate guesswork if you are doing the technique correctly while trying to re-train your leg muscles and feet to walk your new lines. Also, a coach can make sure your swing path is matching your desired target line down the lane to the break point.

Another good practice tip to walk your lines is to place a piece of bowling tape on the approach floor about one inch behind the foul line on the desired board where you intend to slide. Then place another piece of tape on the approach back where you initially position your sliding shoes before you begin walking to the foul line and deliver the ball. Make sure the tape at the foul line is placed on a board about five boards to the left of where the tape back on the approach is placed referencing your sliding shoe. If you are able to walk and deliver a ball, look down at your slide shoe after the delivery, and then see the shoe complete the slide 5 boards left of your initial alignment positioning, you will have successfully walked your lines.

Next, move the tape on the approach where you initially stand across the lane to perhaps where you stand to convert the corner pin spares or where you play any given angle on the lane. It is important to be able to control your right to left footwork pattern from any positioning on the approach and for all angles you might encounter during competition, spares included.

Also, it is important to note that with a change in footwork pattern comes a change in target alignment down the lane. If will have to change where you sight on the lane if you adjust your footwork pattern or change your initial alignment on the approach if your target on the lane is correct for a given session on the lanes. Some practice and alignment experimentation will be necessary when you make adjustments to your footwork pattern.

Walking to the left (again, for right handed bowlers) invites challenges other than merely alignment or sighting adjustments. One such challenge is to make sure your arm swing does not re-align excessively and create too severe of an inside to outside swing path caused by the momentum of your body walking to the left and the ball swinging to follow in the same direction.

Opening and closing the bowling shoulder is a fairly common tendency with power players. It is important to avoid excessive shoulder rotation opening and closing so you can maintain consistently good swing alignment to the target down the lane. If you simply keep in mind that all forces must work together with respect to tempo, direction of footwork, direction of your swing path, and the direction of your release down the desired target line to the break point regardless of any given angle you play on the lane, then your chances of success are high.

It is worth repeating that using a certified coach or a local bowling professional to work with you when developing new footwork lines or swing path lines is highly recommended. The Tour Players use coaches from time to time to help them monitor key elements of their games so why shouldn't you use a coach? Of course, practice makes all the difference
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 12:27 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Reduce Bowling Tension

If you find yourself too nervous or "edgy" before beginning your session on the lanes, then learning how to reduce bowling tension will help you perform under pressure. Since there are many reasons why bowlers experience pressure, it helps to understand what causes these feelings first and then how to reduce bowling tension.

Tension is also referred to as stress, pressure, anxiety, fear, or over eagerness. The common link in all these forms or expressions of tension is energy. Tension is typically derived from static energy or energy stored at a state of rest. When static energy is transformed into kinetic energy, the energy of motion, then the tensions derived from a static energy level are distributed into the body as a flowing state of motion. This state of kinetic energy in bowling may be referred to as a "working energy" and is very useful to help by providing the necessary stimulation to remain focused on your game.

Because of this natural phenomenon of "working energy" in bowling, any tensions you experience before competition will be automatically be transformed into "working energy" and will be useful during competition. It is, therefore, important to recognize that tensions are your personal resource for power needed to compete.

Welcome any nervousness or tension before you begin bowling. Do not force a false sense of relaxation or try and convince yourself you are not nervous. Nerves and tension are welcomed sources of energy and should be acknowledged as such with the understanding that if you allow them to level off into a sustaining "working energy" during your entire session on the lanes, you will give yourself the best chances at success.

It is human nature to accommodate fear, nerves, or anxiety before undertaking anything important. Knowledge of the fact that your brain works most efficiently when it has sufficient energy from which to draw from is the first step to accepting your temporary state of tension or nerves before competition. Because your brain is calling for energy so it can perform its tasks in guiding you in the physical motion required to bowl well, you must allow yourself to indulge the build up of temporary tension so static energy can be stored.

In the same way your brain tells your body to relax and rest when you sleep so your body can store renewed energy for the next morning, your brain tells you when it needs energy to ready your body for physical activities. Allow the forces of nature to flow in your body and become "kinetic working energy" and understand that the burst of tensions are the beginning signs of "working energy" to help you perform you best in competition.

Your automobile needs fuel to burn in order to run properly. Your body, in much the same way, needs food for fuel and a source to convert the nutrition into energy of motion. Tension is the conduit to "working energy" and must be welcomed by you before you compete in any physical endeavor, bowling included.

Fear and tension are also developed by elements unknown to the brain. When your brain has the power to convert the unknown into known tasks to combat the challenges ahead, then the brain can use the fear and tension as its "reservoir of energy" and will enable you to convert the energy of tension into the needed "working energy" to compete.

Many books or writings by sports psychologists share techniques or ideas how to relax during competition. Some techniques require controlled breathing. Some suggestions are to sit still, close your eyes and enter a catatonic state of repose.

Essentially you are asked to suppress the very sources of energy you will need to sustain the rigors of competition. Why not face the tensions head on, welcome them as the first state of "working energy", get yourself prepared for physical competition, and then go to work and enjoy natures own reliable sources of energy while you perform.

Your brain and body require energy to perform. Welcome your natural sources of energy and understand that your fear is merely your brain asking for the raw energy to draw upon for pending physical endeavors. Enjoy your new personal power. We must say, however, you must practice your bowling as often and as long as possible to develop your physical skills. Then your mental powers and "working energy" coupled with developed physical skills will help you achieve the desired results.
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benny
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 3:04 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Complete The Bowling Swing Follow Through

Finishing your bowling swing is an important key to accuracy and speed control. Since the follow through motion refers to the completion of your arm swing process, let's examine how to complete the bowling swing follow through motion.

The "follow through" phrase is one we use in many sports typically when referring to using an arm motion such as a baseball pitcher delivering a pitch to the catcher or in golf where the player completes his or her swing to a full swing arc position and maintains balance while facing the target. Learning how to complete the bowling follow through motion begins at the "moment of release" of the bowling ball during your approach. Once your bowling hand exits the ball, the follow through begins.

Since you have selected a target on the lane where to sight with expectations of rolling your ball over the target and eventually into the pocket, then it makes sense to allow your bowling hand to continue its motion in the direction of your target while completing the arm swing process. Since the release zone, the part of the swing cycle where your hand releases the bowling ball, is near the very bottom of the swing arc or slightly forward on the upswing, then a good rule of thumb is to continue swinging your hand and arm in an upward motion along the swing arc and in the direction of your target.

Your bowling arm elbow should complete the swing arc at least shoulder level or higher with your arm fully extended on each delivery. The continuation of a fully extended forward swing after the ball has exited your hand, known as the follow through, helps to regulate and maintain good ball speed and direction of your delivery to your target. Try and avoid abbreviating your follow through by stopping your hand and arm near your bowling slide knee level after the ball is released.

Restricting the free flowing swing motion to a full follow through position pivoting from your bowling shoulder invites errant deliveries. Usually a less than full follow through will be caused by decelerating the swing once your ball has been released or by trying to release the ball at a very slow ball speed.

A decelerated swing motion might cause your bowling hand to move in a direction away from your intended target line. Also, slowing your swing speed as your hand enters the release zone might cause an early rotation of your bowling hand and therefore an ineffective delivery. Your forward swing and follow through motions should use a gradual acceleration of motion and follow through to shoulder level or higher as to complete the entire swing process each and every delivery.

There may be some danger in forcing the follow through by thrusting your bowling shoulder forward as you release the ball in an attempt to gain a great deal of speed. Swing in an upward motion and avoid allowing your bowling shoulder to extend well past the foul line plane.

Try and develop a full follow through and an upward swing motion every delivery. In golf, using that example again, there are shots requiring less than full swing arcs. In bowling, every swing should be like the driver swing in golf, a full smooth, swing using no more than 90 percent full power so you maintain good balance. Allow your bowling elbow and hand to finish above shoulder level and with the bowling fingers aligned with the outside edge of your bowling shoulder at the completion of the swing.

Finish every swing to the natural extension of your arm and develop the tempo to repeat the same delivery motion at all times. A good follow through will help you improve your accuracy and will lead to good scores.

We hope these tips help you learn how to make an effective follow through. If you have any questions about swing direction techniques, we recommend you seek consultation with a certified bowling coach or with a top amateur/professional player in your area to work at improving the effectiveness of your arm swing.
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 24, 2011 12:09 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Keep Your Head Balanced While Bowling

Learning how to keep your head balanced while bowling is an important key in making an effective bowling ball delivery. Keeping your head as motionless as possible during your approach to the foul line is one key to a well balanced approach.

While examining how to keep your head balanced while bowling, we must first begin with your posture and set-up position on the approach. In the stance position, lean forward about 10 degrees upper-body tilt, allow your backside to push outward slightly, and flex your knees. Set your head in a level position so your chin is not downward and in contact with your chest. A level head position while you walk to the foul line will help you maintain good upper body balance as you enter the critical release zone near your sliding bowling shoe.

Sudden movements of your head will change the center of balance in your torso while you make your approach to the foul line.  Keep your head steady with the chin at or above shoulder level so you are able to maintain balance and stability throughout the approach to the foul line with your eyes fixed on your target. Remaining motionless with your torso during your approach will make it easy to keep your head level and see your target clearly from start to finish of your approach.

Another way to maintain good head balance is to avoid unnecessary upper-body elevation changes, either upward, downward, forward, or back, during the approach and the release. Maintain good knee flex throughout your approach to help you avoid sudden elevation changes. Relaxed and flexed knees help you maintain proper elevation during your approach.

Some bowlers will press their head and shoulders too far forward just prior to release. By pressing forward or thrusting your head forward to try and help you release the bowling ball will shift your balance center and can cause inaccurate deliveries. Avoiding pressing your head forward suddenly before releasing the bowling ball gives you the best change at making a good delivery.

As in any sport, good balance leads to good results. Your chances for error increase when you introduce unneeded head movement during your approach. Keeping your head still and your eyes on your target while walking to the line will lead to improved bowling scores.
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 25, 2011 1:41 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Begin The Bowling Arm Swing

Two key components of an effective bowling arm swing are tempo and direction. Tempo and direction have always been keys of successful arm swings so let's begin by learning how to begin the bowling arm swing.

Hold the bowling ball in your stance position with the center of the ball in positioned in front of your bowling shoulder so the ball is ready to begin the swing cycle along your target line path. Regardless if you refer to hold the ball knee high with your arm extended downward and the back of your hand resting on your leg, if you hold the ball waist high, or if you hold the ball shoulder high, begin the swing motion by moving the ball smoothly toward your target on the lane. Try to sequence the beginning movement of the ball with the first step of a four step approach or slightly before the first step.

It helps to reduce muscle tension by holding the ball against or very nearly against your body. The further from your body that you hold the heavy bowling ball, the more tension in your arm muscles will occur.

Place the ball into motion by allowing your bowling arm to extend fully in order to develop a full radius arm swing path. As you begin the first movement of the ball, simultaneously release your support hand from the ball so the weight of the ball will swing freely, smoothly, and uncontrolled into your back swing.

Ladies should consider holding the ball in the stance position a little further toward the outside edge of the bowling shoulder than men to avoid the ball from swinging back and contacting the leg or hip. A good rule of thumb is to hold the ball with the center part of the ball in front of the bowling shoulder or toward the outside edge of the bowling shoulder, a good technique when learning how to begin the bowling arm swing.

The first movement of the bowling ball is sometimes referred to as the "pushaway" motion. Smoothly "pushing" the ball toward your target on the lane will initiate the swing cycle. Once you have moved the ball into motion toward your target, your ball will swing naturally and smoothly with the force of gravity allowing your bowling arm to be fully extended as your arm begins the back swing cycle. As little of tension as possible in the muscles of your bowling arm will help you begin the "pushaway" motion in a smooth and consistent manner.

Try to avoid a quick and "jerky" motion when beginning the swing. Your "pushaway" can be shaped slightly into an outward and downward rolling motion if you hold the ball waist level or higher. If you hold the ball low with your ball just above knee level, as example, then you should move the ball forward toward your target and then allow the ball to swing back once your bowling arm is extended. In all cases, it is important to begin the swing cycle smoothly and allow your feet to match the pace of your arm swing while maintaining alignment with your target on the lane.

We hope these tips help you learn how to begin your swing. If you have any questions about swing direction techniques, we recommend you seek consultation with a certified bowling coach or with a top amateur/professional player in your area to work at improving the effectiveness of your arm swing.
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PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:50 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How to Curve a Bowling Ball

It is always best when learning to bowl to take a lesson from a certified coach. Learning the proper techniques early is truly the quickest way of developing good bowling skills. If you wish to learn how to curve a bowling ball, however, there are a few things to understand so you can practice these techniques and develop a curve or hook ball delivery.

The first elementary thing to do is to hold the bowling ball in a “handshake” position keeping the wrist very straight and motionless while setting-up on the approach and all through the arm swinging and delivery motions. Try to avoid rotating the wrist away from a handshake position as to either place the ball with the palm of your hand directly behind the ball facing the pins at the moment of release or by rotating your hand where the back of the hand faces the pins at the moment of release. Either hand rotation will produce random results and likely not the consistent curving action on the ball you seek.

Maintaining the “handshake position” during the releasing action of the bowling ball is the simplest method of learning how to curve a bowling ball. A wrist support bowling accessory device can be helpful to produce a firm and straight wrist position throughout the swinging and release motions.

If you try and copy the pro bowlers on television with their releases, you will likely get caught in a trap of uncertainty and produce poor results.
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 3:32 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Bowling Posture

Proper bowling posture is extremely important in making an effective approach. Maintaining good balance and being in an athletic position at all times during the approach to the foul line begin with good posture. The position of your upper body at stance and throughout the approach to the foul line will encourage consistent a release because of a stable body positioning during your sliding step.

Here are a few essential elements in good bowling posture:

1. In the stance position, lean forward about 10-15 degrees upper-body tilt, allow your behind to push outward slightly, and flex your knees as to bring the knee caps directly over the toes of your shoes. This stance will encourage a solid, athletic body position before you begin walking to the foul line. This posture should be maintained during the slide and release.

2. Ensure your bowling shoulder is no more than one inch below the level of your non-bowling shoulder, if any, and maintain that relationship throughout the walk to the foul line. Also, if you have a curve or hook ball delivery, keep the bowling shoulder slightly behind the non-bowling shoulder throughout your approach. Avoid excessive shoulder-rotation back-and-forward while swinging the bowling ball. Maintain the front-portion of the bowling shoulder facing the target as long as possible during the approach.

3. Place the bowling ball in your bowling hand immediately in front of your bowling shoulder and as close to your body as is comfortable. The closer the ball is to your body, the more relaxed are the arm muscles and the desired arm-swing path will be achieved. Maintain this relationship of shoulders above the knees and the degree of upper-body tilt throughout the walk to the foul line to ensure good balance and stability while releasing the ball.

4. Keep your head steady with the chin above shoulder level and pointing to your target so you would be able to easily balance a book or glass of water on top of your head. Try and maintain this same position of your head throughout the approach to the foul line with your eyes fixed on your target to help you maintain good overall balance.

5. Remain motionless with the upper body at all times during the approach and as stable as possible while releasing the ball during the sliding step. Avoid unnecessary upper-body elevation changes, either upward, downward, forward or back during the approach and the release.

These five elements will establish a good bowling posture. Consistently good results in bowling happen with a solid foundation linked with a stable, upper body positioning during the entire approach.
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2011 4:15 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Release


The legendary Earl Anthony, the first bowler in history to reach forty professional tour titles, was often quoted giving this key release tip to his pro-am partners: “let your hand follow your ball toward your target.”

When your bowling ball exits your hand at the moment of release, allow your hand to continuing moving toward your target down lane following the ball path. Ideally, the front part of your bowling arm (where blood is normally drawn in a laboratory) should be facing the pins at the moment of release. Your bowling fingers should rotate slightly after your thumb exits the ball without the entire arm rotating. The bowling fingers should rotate perhaps two hours on a clock dial, from six to four o’clock as example for a right handed bowler, so you will create enough bowling ball axis tilt to produce a positive hooking motion.

Once the ball leaves your hand, follow through in the same direction as the ball travels toward your target. Prevent your bowling hand from moving in a different direction than the ball is traveling with your elbow also following the ball directly behind your hand so you avoid deliveries left or right of your target line. The forward-swing continuing motion after the release, known as the follow-through, should also maintain a target orientation. Hold your form until the ball passes the target. Now, please, practice!
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2011 2:59 pm  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Use The Bowling Arrows

Learning how to use the bowling arrows is a big step to improving accuracy and targeting the pocket or spares. A good way to begin is to first understand where the arrows are located in reference to the pins on the pin-deck and to the dots on the approach. By knowing a little about the "lane geometry", you will more easily understand how to use the bowling arrows.

The arrows are located about 15 feet past the foul line toward the pins and are in a triangular configuration. The arrows are also commonly referred to as "dovetails." From bowler's right to left (for right handed bowlers), the arrow nearest the edge of the lane is referred to as the "first arrow" and is located on the 5 board of the lane surface, about 5 inches from the edge of the lane.

Continuing to the bowler's left, the next arrow is the "second arrow" which is located on the 10 board. The "third arrow" is located on the 15 board, the "fourth arrow", or center arrow, is located on the 20 board, "the fifth arrow" on the 25 board, the "sixth arrow" on the 30 board, and the final "seventh arrow" on the 35 board. The arrows are symmetrically placed on the lane. Using a reverse reference system is recommended for left handed bowlers.

The 4th arrow (center arrow) is aligned exactly on the same board as is the head pin and the five pin on the pin-deck about 60 feet from the foul line and also with the largest of the dot located just behind the foul line at the beginning of the lane bed. The 3rd arrow, to the right of the 4th arrow, lines up with the 3 pin on the pin-deck and with the dot to the right of the center dot on the approach, and so on across the lane. The seven dots on the approach behind the foul line align precisely with the arrows on the lane and with the front pins of a full rack of pins on the pin-deck.

The arrows are primarily intended for alignment purposes when targeting a given pin combination on the pin-deck. Generally speaking, it is easier to take dead aim at a target closer to you than in the distance. Since the bowling arrows are only about 15 feet from where you slide on the approach at the foul line at the moment you deliver the bowling ball, it makes sense to use the intermediate target at the bowling arrows when sighting with your eyes rather than staring way down the lane at the pins.

When coaches teach a student the proper posture or body position by which to release the bowling ball, sighting the arrows is much easier than sighting the pins. Of course, there are bowlers who sight beyond the arrows or before the arrows, such as directly down at the foul line or down the lane in front of the pins. It is generally recognized, however, that using the arrows as an intermediate target works nicely in the vast majority of cases. In fact, most professional and top-flight amateur bowlers use the arrows as a targeting system.

The maintenance team at any given bowling center typically sets up the lane oiling machine to apply the heaviest concentration of oil on the front end of the lane between the foul line up to a distance perhaps of 20 feet (just beyond the distance where the 4th arrow is located) and across the lane between the 2nd arrow and the 6th arrow (the 10th board from both edges of the lane). In this case, it is suggested that a bowler will align his strike ball delivery to the pocket in such a way as to roll the bowling ball toward the second arrow with an appropriate angle from the release point just beyond the foul line as to allow the ball to continue down the lane to the pocket.

If a bowler rolls a perfectly straight ball delivery with no curve or hook, then the ball should be released just beyond the foul line on about the 7 or 8 board, roll over the 2nd arrow (10 board), and continue toward the pocket which is located on the 17.5 board at the pin-deck.

If a straight ball is delivered from the 10 board at release, crosses the 2nd arrow, and heads down the lane, the ball will not contact the head pin or the pocket but rather contact the 6 pin or perhaps the 3 and 6 pins. For this reason, and angle to the 2nd arrow from the release point beyond the foul line, say from about the 7 or 8 board, is necessary in order for the bowling ball to contact the pocket when delivered with no hooking motion. Naturally, a left handed bowler will reference boards on the lane from left to right.

If a bowler rolls a slight curve or hook delivery, then the ball should contact the lane just beyond the foul line on about the 12 or 13 board, roll over the 2nd arrow, and then the ball will change directions about two-thirds of the way down the lane at the break point and head toward the pocket located at the 17.5 board.

Bowlers using a reverse hook delivery, also known as a back-up ball delivery, should take a greater angle to the 2nd arrow such as releasing the ball beyond the foul line on about the 5 board, roll over the 2nd arrow and continue to the pocket. It is not recommended to use a back-up ball delivery and most professional coaches will work with a bowler to make the change to a conventional hook delivery so a more appropriate angle of entry to the pocket is created which will result in improved pin carry.

Bowlers with a strong release creating a good deal of hook should take a wider angle to the 2nd arrow to allow for the ball to contact the pocket.

The 2nd arrow is a good place for an initial alignment but it is not necessarily the correct board to sight when targeting the pins. You may have to use a board located to the right or to the left of the 2nd arrow and make the correct adjustment in order to roll your ball and contact the pocket depending on your type of delivery, the speed you roll your bowling ball, and the ball surface and core construction you select.

The process of alignment is very geometric and matches nicely with use of the bowling arrows. We hope these tips help you understand the use of the bowling arrows!
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PostPosted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:16 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

Pressure Bowling Tips

Knowing a few pressure bowling tips will help you perform well under the heat of competition, regardless of your average or abilities. Good bowling performances originate through dedicated and purposeful practice. If your game is well practiced, it becomes much easier to bowl in pressure situations.

I wish to present these seven simple pressure bowling tips:

1. Think about a good start to your approach and then a good finish. Between, focus sharply on your selected target on the lane.

2. Focus on making one good bowling delivery at a time.

3. Use on a consistent pace or tempo of footsteps without hurrying the final two steps of your approach which are very critical to good shot-making. Fast steps will cause hurried and inaccurate releases.

4. Hold your form at the foul line after releasing the bowling ball. Balance during and after the critical release of the bowling ball is vital to accuracy and good results.

5. Minimize arm and leg tension while you bowl. Relaxed muscles move smoothly, quickly, and effectively.

6. Practice often with a purposeful commitment. Key on the most critical components of your game and spend time addressing these keys to success.

7. Make your alignment decision before stepping onto the approach. "Plan your work" off of the approach and "work your plan on the approach."

Often we see bowlers trying so hard, almost in desperation, to win a tournament in the first game of the event that we see them lose their focus and energy later before the conclusion of the event. In fact, that bowler may have "spent his powder" before arriving at the bowling center. One wins the tournament in the last game, not the first game.

Pace yourself, store your energies to use the entire duration of your sessions on the lanes, and repeat tip #2 above.

If you are gearing up for an important competition, consult your bowling coach/instructor when you practice to make sure your important physical game fundamentals are well tuned.

Practice by moving pairs of lanes across the bowling center. Prepare using all of your primary bowling equipment. Try to practice bowling on similar lane conditions as you will encounter in your competition.

If you think there are some great secrets to bowling well under pressure and you wish to consult with the great "Swaami of Tenpins" or spend money on sessions with world famous sports psychologists, be our guest. If you wish to read books written by the great thinkers in history, go ahead and do so. But if you simply want sensible pressure bowling tips, then build the above listed tips into your bowling scheme today.

Keep it simple. Success comes from developing good physical game fundamentals and then applying them in competition.
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 04, 2011 12:39 am  Post subject: Re: SHARE A KNOWLEDGE IN BOWLING! Reply with quote

How To Make Bowling Parallel Adjustments


Learning how to make bowling parallel adjustments is a big step to increasing your "strike" potential, leaving easy spares to convert, and to improving your overall scores. The goal of all bowlers should be to become competent in quickly adjusting to various lane conditions. How to make bowling parallel adjustments is a proven and tested system which works on virtually all standard house lane conditions.

Let's establish a couple of things early on - first, it is important to note that a variety of lane adjustment techniques exist and can be used effectively. The "parallel" system is one such method which is dependable and generally will provide good results while being easy to implement during competition. It is important to also strongly consider consulting a certified coach or instructor if you would like to learn about alignment systems and adjustment techniques.

The other thing is that any reference to alignment adjustments in this article will be for the right handed bowler only. Very simply, merely reverse the adjustment details for left handed bowlers!

The "parallel adjustment" system is one which is designed to make adjustments with your feet positioning on the approach and with your siting target on the lane, usually at the bowling arrows. Adjustments from an initial alignment are needed when the lanes break down from excessive linage with the bowling balls passing through the same general area on the lane which causes the oil to break down and transition elsewhere on the lane surface.

Did you know that when a bowling ball passes through lane oil, the oil will actually open as the ball passes through a given area of oil and then close again after the ball leaves that area? Liken a car tire passing through a water puddle on the road, as example, where the water opens or separates as the tire travels through the water puddle, then the water closes back into a similar puddle after the tires passes by the puddle area.


Eventually, as enough bowling ball deliveries pass through the existing oil on the lane surface, the oil will no longer close and a gap between the concentration of oil where the ball passed through most frequently will exist. When oil no longer closes and leaves an area where very little or no oil settles, then the lane is said to have broken down. It is time, therefore, to make an adjustment so your bowling ball can pick up skid and not begin to roll too soon through the drier area of the lane and miss the pocket.

It is amazing how few bowlers will adjust quickly enough or make adjustments which do not match the oil pattern applied to the lane surface by the lane oiling machine and the computerized program of oil application. Unfortunately, bowlers, like most humans, are creatures of habit and resist change. In bowling, not adjusting your strike alignment can mean losing the ability to hit the pocket consistently and reduce your pin carry, leave a difficult spare pin-combination, and achieve less than desired scores. Making smart and prompt adjustments separate the top flight amateur and professional bowlers from all other bowlers.

Typically, most bowling centers use a lane oiling procedure which creates the highest volume of oil conditioner located between the 2nd arrow on the right of the lane and the 2nd arrow on the left side of the lane, certainly for league play. Also, the heaviest volume of oil is located from the foul line where the bowling ball first contacts the lane surface down the lane to approximately 20 feet distance past the foul line. Of course, each bowling center has its own oiling procedures, but in many cases, the 2nd arrow is a good place for siting your initial alignment to the pocket.

Depending on your release technique, targeting the 2nd arrow is the logical place to begin your deliveries while warming up for a session on the lanes. If you have a modest curve or hook ball delivery, then you will use an angle from left of the 10 board, say about the 13 or 14 board just beyond the foul line, your slide shoe instep will cover the 19 board, and your ball will continue toward the 10 board or 2nd arrow, and then continuing further down the lane to the break point about two-thirds the way down the lane, and then finally hooking to the pocket.

In cases with bowlers with high rev-rates and who create very sharply hooking deliveries, more extreme angles to the 2nd arrow will be necessary so the ball will ultimately end up hitting the pocket. Bowlers rolling the ball very straight will need to adjust the opposite direction with a more direct angle to the pocket, as you might expect. A sound and consistent initial alignment positioning is important as a basis of reference.

Adjustments in initial alignment will be needed when a ball is delivered accurately toward the 2nd arrow but does not end up solidly impacting the pocket. The amount of adjustment for missing the pocket from your initial alignment, either to the left or to the right, depends on how far you missed the pocket after rolling your ball over your target.

We recommend a "parallel adjustment system" whereby you simply move your feet two boards on the approach and your target on the lane one board, in the same direction, either to the left or to the right. Moving your feet two boards right and your target on the lane one board right (as example when the ball slides too far and misses the pocket to the right) will close your angle and create a more direct route for your ball to travel and contact the pocket. If after adjusting 2:1 ratio to the right and your ball still does not make it to the pocket solidly, then adjust another 2:1 boards to the right. Continue making 2:1 ratio adjustments until your angle matches to the oil conditions and your ball finally contacts the pocket solidly at the 17.5 board on the pin deck.

Adjusting in the opposite direction, 2:1 boards to the left from your initial alignment positioning, will work for lanes which have less than heavy oil and which causes your ball to hook too early and miss the pocket to the left (again in the case of right handed bowlers). Multiple adjustments of 2:1 boards, either left or right, will either close your angle to the pocket on oily lanes or open your angle to the break point down the lane on dry lanes or when oil break down occurs during your session on the lanes.

Of course, parallel adjustments may also be made in increments of 1:1 ratios for the fine tuning adjustments and in ratios of 3:1 for greater angle changes to the break point down the lane. The 2:1 common parallel adjustment typically works nicely on most house conditions if the oiling conditions are not too severely oily or dry.

For another example, if you miss the pocket to the left and leave the 3 pin remaining standing, you missed the pocket by an average of about 5 boards. Therefore, adjust your feet to the left five boards and your target on the lane half as much, 2-3 boards, and deliver your next strike ball at the adjusted target on the lane. By moving left into the greater concentration of lane oil, the needed ball skid which caused your ball to react too quickly and cross over the head pin will be restored. By bringing your target on the lane half as many boards as you adjusted your feet positioning on the approach will automatically change the angle necessary for your bowling ball to travel from the release point just beyond the foul line down the lane to the break point before hooking back and finding the pocket once again.

In short, adjust your feet the amount of boards your ball missed contacting the pocket solidly at the 17.5 board on the deck. In some competitions where lane changes after each game of bowling are required, you might encounter more dramatic changes of lane conditions and adjustments might be as much as 10:5 or 12:6 or greater, depending on how the lane reacts after the your first ball delivery on that new lane.

Your eyes are your best ally - trust what you see and adjust accordingly. Don't be stubborn; if you ball does not contact the pocket, then next time on the same lane, try to make a a parallel adjustment in accordance to where your ball ended up at the pins the previous time on the given lane. If you know you made a good delivery and the ball misses the pocket, MOVE! Make an adjustment. Fear prevents talent from prevailing. Trust your eyes use your adjustment system.

One final tip for your practice sessions, find your strike alignment initially as to roll several deliveries consecutively into the pocket, then adjust to the right in increments of 2:1 boards and roll perhaps three deliveries from the adjusted position before adjusting again another 2:1 boards to the right, and so on across the lane until you have made a series of adjustments totaling perhaps 14 boards on the approach and 7 boards on the lane near the bowling arrows. After completing that practice drill, go back to your original alignment position and then adjust in increments of 2:1 boards to the left simulating drying lane conditions. Adjust a series of perhaps 6 to 8 adjustments and roll at least three deliveries from each adjusted position. The lane will appear awkwardly when you adjust to positions on the approach unfamiliar to you because of your lack of practice using these areas on the approach or on the lane at the targeting arrows. That's why practice is so important - you can rehearse your parallel adjustments when your scores do not matter and become more accomplished at making good adjustments in competition.

As you practice, take note where the ball ends up at the pins. You will begin to see a pattern develop so when you are in competition and your ball does not end up where you are targeting, you will make a swift adjustment the next time you bowl on the given lane and the best chances of your rolling your ball into the pocket will increase.

If the top amateur and professional players consult with coaches, why not you? Of course, I will try to help you better understand the game of bowling.

We have already reached around 40 or more articles, after on the next few articles that I will share, I will now ask from you guys, which of all the articles works best for you so we can share more knowledge in bowling.

I hope with sharing of knowledge in bowling, your game must improve somehow.

My next sharing will be on HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR BOWLING CONCENTRATION! This is very interesting! Wait for the next article! Bye!
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